parenting

(redirected from Childrearing)
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Related to Childrearing: parenting

parenting

 [par´ent-ing]
providing a nurturing and constructive environment that promotes growth and development in a child or children; see also attachment.
impaired parenting a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as inability of the primary caregiver to create, maintain, or regain an environment that promotes the optimum growth and development of the child.
risk for impaired parenting a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as risk for inability of the primary caretaker to create, maintain, or regain an environment that promotes the optimum growth and development of the child.

parenting

The activities carried out by a parent–eg, supplying physical sustenance, emotional support instilling moral values, etc. See Bonding; Father 'factor. ', Motherhood. Cf Anaclitic depression, Child abuse.

parenting

(par-en-teng)
1. Caring for and raising a child or children.
2. Producing offspring.

impaired parenting

Inability of the primary caretaker to create an environment that promotes the optimum growth and development of the child.

impaired parenting, risk for

Risk for inability of the primary caretaker to create, maintain, or regain an environment that promotes the optimum growth and development of the child.

surrogate parenting

An alternative method of childbearing for an infertile couple in which the wife is unable to bear a child. The surrogate mother agrees to be artificially inseminated by the husband's sperm and to relinquish the baby to the couple. Another approach is to retrieve eggs from the infertile wife and have them impregnated in vitro by her husband. The fertilized ovum is then implanted in the surrogate mother.
See: fertilization, in vitro; GIFT

parenting

The process of caring for, nurturing and upbringing of a child.

Patient discussion about parenting

Q. I’m with depression. I don't want to tell this to my parents, so what can I do to cure it? I’m with depression. And I seem to be depressed only when I spend an extended amount of time with family and then I leave them. I don't want to tell this to my parents, so what can I do to cure it?

A. Sounds like you are missing home. Call them up and yack on the phone some. Its part of life to have to be out on your own and everyone usually misses home. Its good you have one to go back to. But you can decide to try and make some roots right where you are. You can't really live your life in two places at once. The advice I was given by a very spiritual person I used to talk to alot was that you have to bloom where you are planted. Make the best of where you are at and quit worrying about how it could be somewhere else. Try and make some friends and get involved in something where you are at. Get put and explore around and see what happens.

Q. Are there any special forums for parents to kids with cancer? I think my sister could really use that kind of support group of people who are going through the exact same thing they never dreamed to be.

A. But how should I tell her to go there? she acts like she doesn't need help. she says she isn't the one who needs treatment and she wouldn't want to waste time and energy on herself now- only on the kid. How do I convince her it's important?

Q. why is it that some women lack parental nutrition?

A. Do you mean breastfeeding? Some women have problem with their nipples, in rare cases the breast tissue isn't developed enough. Sometimes breast surgeries damage the milk ducts. Psychological factors also play a role.

More discussions about parenting
References in periodicals archive ?
By looking at the different discourses of power balancing that change both with one's developmental stages and with one's sociopolitical and cultural contexts, the chapter's findings move China studies beyond the indiscriminant use of Western concepts to more effective application of contingent, dynamic models that better fit Chinese childrearing cases.
This Article explores what it would mean for family law to consider explicitly all of the sites of childrearing, the actors who occupy those sites, and the types of childrearing that take place at those sites.
Female knowledge about childbirth and childrearing was most commonly based on intuition and experience, both personal and handed down, and Cadogan was quick to denigrate its lack of scientific basis.
This paper uses the 40-year separation of East and West Germany as a unique natural laboratory to evaluate and compare the extent to which social policy redistributed childrearing costs in these two countries with similar prewar history and culture but different post-war economic systems.
From the child, now an adult, raised by freedom-fighting parents to tales of childrearing based on faith and perseverance in the times of Jim Crow, most of the essays with an average length of twenty-plus pages will make you "work" to extract valuable life lessons.
A particularly fine example is Mary Ellen Lamb's discussion of how The Faerie Queene merges a written classical tradition (marked as masculine) with an oral practice of telling fairy tales (that derives from popular culture and Elizabethan childrearing practices, and is marked as feminine).
The author attempts to explain our obsession with self-fulfillment without any reference to Benjamin Spock or his psychoanalytically-derived ideas of childrearing.
This features a "webzine" devoted to the latest buzz on fashion, the arts, childrearing, travel, fine dining and other subjects of special interest to New Yorkers.
Jane Ribbens' Mothers and Their Children: A Feminist Sociology of Childrearing (1994) provides a mother-centered empirical contribution to a growing literature that complicates her distinction between private and public spheres.
Undoubtedly, childrearing does take them out of the workplace for certain periods of time.
Interviews with Canadian child care workers and minority parents showed that the two groups disagreed about why parents are not involved enough, were unaware of their basic differences in early childhood education goals, and disagreed substantially over what constitutes proper childrearing methods.
Stearns, Anxious Parents: A History of Modern Childrearing in America (New York, 2003), 13, 23-25.