Child-Pugh score


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Child-Pugh score

assessment scale used in clinical staging of cirrhosis.
A scoring system used to assess the prognosis of chronic liver disease, mainly cirrhosis, to predict operative mortality, the need for titrate therapy and the need for liver transplantation

Child-Pugh score

Hepatology A scoring system used in Pts undergoing TIPS, which describes a range of severity of liver disease. See TIPS.
References in periodicals archive ?
Child-Pugh score [19] was calculated according to hepatic encephalopathy, ascites, total bilirubin, albumin, and INR.
Our previous systematic review and meta-analysis suggested that the performance of MELD score had a higher specificity than the Child-Pugh score for the assessment of prognosis in patients with acute-on-chronic liver failure (3).
Clinical factors and their association with small bowel lesions were examined; these included sex, age, liver function (Child-Pugh score), etiology of the cirrhosis (viral/nonviral), laboratory test results (hemoglobin, serum ferritin, serum iron, total bilirubin, aspartate transaminase, alanine transaminase, albumin, prothrombin time, and platelet count), model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) score, and presence or absence of EV, GV, PHG, PHC, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), portal vein tumor thrombus, or ascites.
The patients with YMDD mutations were significantly more likely to have an increased Child-Pugh score than were those without such mutations.
The chronic liver failure-sequential organ failure assessment (CLIF-SOFA) score, Child-Pugh score, and model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) score were calculated from the collected data.
Cirrhosis patients were further divided according to Child-Pugh score [17] into three subgroups, Child-Pugh class A had 81 patients, Child-Pugh class B had 30 patients, and Child-Pugh class C had 22 patients.
Liver disease severity was also assessed at baseline according to the Model for End Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score and Child-Pugh score. Starting doses of once-daily NSBB were 6.25 mg for carvedilol and 80 mg for modified release propranolol.
According to relation between Child-Pugh score and MELD, we recommended echocardiography evaluation in all child B and C cirrhotic patients.
When those two variables, the treatment received, and the Child-Pugh score were entered into the multivariate analysis, only a variceal size greater than 5 mm was associated independently with an increased risk of variceal bleeding.
Drop in FG was observed in all cirrhotic patients (p=0.009), however not in patients with Child-Pugh score B/C (p=0.568).
The Child-Pugh score and the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score were used to assess decreased liver function, and both were significantly higher in the control group than in the case group (9.5 [+ or -] 2.7 versus 8.4 [+ or -] 2.3; P = 0.001, 20.7 [+ or -] 10.2 versus 14.0 [+ or -] 5.0; P < 0.001).
Akin to Child-Pugh score, MELD score does not (or no longer) take into account particular causes of cirrhosis and aggravating factors.