parenting

(redirected from Child rearing)
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Related to Child rearing: parenting

parenting

 [par´ent-ing]
providing a nurturing and constructive environment that promotes growth and development in a child or children; see also attachment.
impaired parenting a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as inability of the primary caregiver to create, maintain, or regain an environment that promotes the optimum growth and development of the child.
risk for impaired parenting a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as risk for inability of the primary caretaker to create, maintain, or regain an environment that promotes the optimum growth and development of the child.

parenting

The activities carried out by a parent–eg, supplying physical sustenance, emotional support instilling moral values, etc. See Bonding; Father 'factor. ', Motherhood. Cf Anaclitic depression, Child abuse.

parenting

(par-en-teng)
1. Caring for and raising a child or children.
2. Producing offspring.

impaired parenting

Inability of the primary caretaker to create an environment that promotes the optimum growth and development of the child.

impaired parenting, risk for

Risk for inability of the primary caretaker to create, maintain, or regain an environment that promotes the optimum growth and development of the child.

surrogate parenting

An alternative method of childbearing for an infertile couple in which the wife is unable to bear a child. The surrogate mother agrees to be artificially inseminated by the husband's sperm and to relinquish the baby to the couple. Another approach is to retrieve eggs from the infertile wife and have them impregnated in vitro by her husband. The fertilized ovum is then implanted in the surrogate mother.
See: fertilization, in vitro; GIFT

parenting

The process of caring for, nurturing and upbringing of a child.

Patient discussion about parenting

Q. I’m with depression. I don't want to tell this to my parents, so what can I do to cure it? I’m with depression. And I seem to be depressed only when I spend an extended amount of time with family and then I leave them. I don't want to tell this to my parents, so what can I do to cure it?

A. Sounds like you are missing home. Call them up and yack on the phone some. Its part of life to have to be out on your own and everyone usually misses home. Its good you have one to go back to. But you can decide to try and make some roots right where you are. You can't really live your life in two places at once. The advice I was given by a very spiritual person I used to talk to alot was that you have to bloom where you are planted. Make the best of where you are at and quit worrying about how it could be somewhere else. Try and make some friends and get involved in something where you are at. Get put and explore around and see what happens.

Q. Are there any special forums for parents to kids with cancer? I think my sister could really use that kind of support group of people who are going through the exact same thing they never dreamed to be.

A. But how should I tell her to go there? she acts like she doesn't need help. she says she isn't the one who needs treatment and she wouldn't want to waste time and energy on herself now- only on the kid. How do I convince her it's important?

Q. why is it that some women lack parental nutrition?

A. Do you mean breastfeeding? Some women have problem with their nipples, in rare cases the breast tissue isn't developed enough. Sometimes breast surgeries damage the milk ducts. Psychological factors also play a role.

More discussions about parenting
References in periodicals archive ?
Glasgow, Dornbach, Troyer, Stinberg and Ritter studied the relationship between child rearing approaches and educational findings among adolescents and youth.
offers an intriguing study of the development of individual and civic identity in a liberal American context, exploring the methodologies of child rearing and education in the country's early years and evaluating the effects of twentieth-century variations in educational and family norms on modern trends in the definition of citizenship and social cohesion.
The report by USDA's Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion notes that family income affects child rearing costs.
16) In response, the Japanese government set as one of its four major objectives for the "21st Century Healthy and Happy Family" (17) to promote the healthy psychological development of children and alleviate parents' anxiety in relation to child rearing.
Still longer increases would necessitate a shift in our view of lifecycle events such as education (which may occur periodically throughout life), marriage, child rearing, and suicide.
I don't have to spend my hard-earned money on child rearing, and this is nothing to be "ashamed of.
2) While effeminate or unmanly boys were not artifacts of the twentieth century, the meaning attached to them shifted in conjunction with the politics of masculinity and transformations in child rearing, gender socialization, and the new sciences of human development.
Mgrdichian and Abajian conceived the project two years ago as they learned the ropes of child rearing firsthand.
For a study that focuses on women's gambling beliefs and activities, and the impact on their family life and child rearing practice, including women gamblers in general and minority women gamblers.
Moreover, when the nonresident father is more involved in child rearing, the resident mother has added support and is able to be a better mother (Aldous, 1996).
The 10-member panel led by Masami Ohinata, professor at Tokyo's Keisen University, said younger generations lack competence in child rearing because of the development of the nuclear family.
The material form draws you into the words and seems an apt accompaniment, with its suggestions of domesticity, cleansing, child rearing, and ephemerality.

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