chewing gum

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chewing gum

A confection made of chicle (natural latex) or synthetic rubber (polyisobutylene), which is in more common use.

Health benefits, chewing gum
Caries
• Sweeteners—Sugar-free gum sweetened with xylitol reduces cavities and plaque by inhibiting Streptococcus mutans, a major cause of tooth decay; sorbitol, another common chewing gum sweetener, is one-third as effective as xylitol.
• Enamel repair—Some data suggest that calcium lactate reduces plaque formation and enhances enamel remineralisation when added to xylitol-containing gum.
• Chewing—Some studies attribute the anti-caries effect of gum to the chewing itself.
• Weight loss—Chewing gum leads to extra energy consumption of 11±3 kcal/hour, which would translate into a 5 kg/year loss of body fat.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dr Griffiths said if Samantha had been consuming up to 14 sticks of the gum a day it would have amounted to "a substantial amount" of sweeteners, up to 16gm, and may have played a role in reducing her levels of salt, magnesium and calcium levels, though he said there was no evidence to show the laxative effect of chewing-gum had ever played a part in anyone's death.
"These findings clearly illustrate the benefit of chewing-gum on sustained attention or vigilance, particularly as time-on-task increases, and we might, with caution, infer that the benefit is mediated via the effect of chewing-gum on alertness.
Different chewing-gum companies use different ingredients to create the gum base.
Chewing-gum manufacturers are already worried that some councils might call for a tax on their product to pay for the costs of cleaning it up.