Cerenkov radiation

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Ce·ren·kov ra·di·a·tion

(kren'kŏv),
light given off by a transparent medium when a high-energy particle speeds through it at a velocity greater than that of light in that medium.

Cerenkov,

(Cherenkov), Pavel A., Russian physicist and Nobel laureate, 1904-1990.
Cerenkov radiation - light given off by a transparent medium when a high-energy particle speeds through it at a velocity greater than that of light in that medium.
References in periodicals archive ?
The large mirrors of its five telescopes collect Cherenkov radiation and reflect it onto extremely sensitive cameras.
The dispersive wave emission generates at the distance of 5 mm, which is associated with the development of stable distinct spectral peak in spectral domain called the Cherenkov radiation. Here we define the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the pulse and spectrum as the pulse width and spectral width, respectively.
Jiang et al., "Experimental verification of reversed cherenkov radiation in Left-Handed metamaterial," Physical Review Letters, vol.
Chen, "Research progress in reversed Cherenkov radiation in double-negative metamaterials," Progress In Electromagnetics Research, Vol.
The Cherenkov radiation is caused by charged particles moving through the air, producing a faint luminescence that can be detected and analyzed for information on particles that generate it.
Besides the Cherenkov radiation, a part of the energy is converted into acoustic energy.
1904), was the first to observe this wake of radiation, which came to be called Cherenkov radiation as a result.
Another explanation of the vent light migh involve something called Cherenkov radiation, which comes from radioactive elements such as potassium-40.
Cherenkov radiation by a charged source that moves in a left-handed material and has not the own frequency has been studied in number of works [17-23].
We would see a patch of sky glowing eerie blue, the Cherenkov radiation resulting from interactions when the gamma rays hit the upper atmosphere.
That is why astronomers glowed with excitement last year when two Cherenkov radiation detectors recorded the first, normally elusive neutrino particles from a supernova (SN: 3/21/87, p.180).