chenodeoxycholic acid

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chenodeoxycholic acid

 [ke″no-de-ok″se-ko´lic]
one of the primary bile acids in humans, usually found conjugated with glycine or taurine; it facilitates fat absorption and cholesterol excretion. The pharmaceutical preparation, called chenodiol, is used in treatment of gallstones.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

che·no·de·ox·y·cho·lic ac·id

(kē'nō-dē-oks'ē-kō'lik as'id),
A major bile acid in many vertebrates, usually conjugated with glycine or taurine; it facilitates cholesterol excretion and fat absorption; administered to dissolve cholesterol gallstones.
Synonym(s): chenodiol
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

chenodeoxycholic acid

A bile acid with detergent properties. It has been used as a drug to dissolve GALLSTONES, but this takes 6 months to 2 years.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

che·no·de·ox·y·cho·lic ac·id

(kē'nō-dē-oks'ē-kō'lik as'id)
A major bile acid in many vertebrates; facilitates cholesterol excretion and fat absorption; administered to dissolve cholesterol gallstones.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Mean % binding values superscripted by different letters at each concentration of each bile acid are significantly different at p < 0.05; ethanol bark and DCM : M bark zero binding for sodium glycodeoxycholate at 1 mg/mL; DCM : M bark zero binding for sodium chenodeoxycholate at 1 mg/mL; DCM : M: dichloromethane : methanol.
difficile, whereas chenodeoxycholate has a strong inhibitory effect on spore germination.
Sonenshein, "Chenodeoxycholate is an inhibitor of Clostridium difficile spore germination," Journal of Bacteriology, vol.
Chenodeoxycholate was administered in a pH-sensitive methacrylate coating to maximize delivery to the colon.
Chenodeoxycholate is currently not FDA approved for the treatment of IBS-C, reported Dr.
For the FGFR4 SNP rs376618, participants with the TT genotype showed significantly accelerated transit, compared with placebo, in response to both doses of chenodeoxycholate, while only the high dose produced a significant response in those with the TC/CC genotype.
Further analysis focused on chenodeoxycholate's effect on ascending colonic emptying time (a surrogate for colonic transit), taking into consideration both the Klotho-beta rs17618244 genotype and the clinical phenotype (healthy or IB5-(2).
In previous studies, chenodeoxycholate accelerated colonic transit, increased stool frequency, and loosened stool consistency in both healthy volunteers and patients with IBS-C.
The current results suggest that screening IBS-C patients for common polymorphisms in the FGFR4 and Klotho-beta genes may help preselect the subset of patients who will achieve the best clinical response to chenodeoxycholate pharmacotherapy