chenodeoxycholic acid

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chenodeoxycholic acid

 [ke″no-de-ok″se-ko´lic]
one of the primary bile acids in humans, usually found conjugated with glycine or taurine; it facilitates fat absorption and cholesterol excretion. The pharmaceutical preparation, called chenodiol, is used in treatment of gallstones.

che·no·de·ox·y·cho·lic ac·id

(kē'nō-dē-oks'ē-kō'lik as'id),
A major bile acid in many vertebrates, usually conjugated with glycine or taurine; it facilitates cholesterol excretion and fat absorption; administered to dissolve cholesterol gallstones.
Synonym(s): chenodiol

chenodeoxycholic acid

/che·no·de·oxy·cho·lic ac·id/ (ke″no-de-ok″se-kol´ik) a primary bile acid, usually conjugated with glycine or taurine; it facilitates fat absorption and cholesterol excretion.

chenodeoxycholic acid

[kē′nōdē·ok′sikō′lik]
a secondary bile acid. It is used in vivo to dissolve cholesterol gallstones, particularly in the elderly and poor-risk patients. See also ursodeoxycholic acid.

chenodeoxycholic acid

A bile acid with detergent properties. It has been used as a drug to dissolve GALLSTONES, but this takes 6 months to 2 years.

che·no·de·ox·y·cho·lic ac·id

(kē'nō-dē-oks'ē-kō'lik as'id)
A major bile acid in many vertebrates; facilitates cholesterol excretion and fat absorption; administered to dissolve cholesterol gallstones.

chenodeoxycholic acid

a primary bile acid, C24H40O4, administered as an anticholelithogenic agent. Called also chenodiol.
References in periodicals archive ?
Analysis of the Klotho-beta SNP rs17618244 by the GG or GA/AA genotypes showed that the drug accelerated transit only for those with the GG subtype receiving high-dose chenodeoxycholate.
Therapeutic responses to either dose of chenodeoxycholate were not seen in healthy volunteers, no matter what their rs17618244 genotype, nor in IBSC patients with the GA/AA genotypes.
In previous studies, chenodeoxycholate accelerated colonic transit, increased stool frequency, and loosened stool consistency in both healthy volunteers and patients with IBS-C.
The current results suggest that screening IBS-C patients for common polymorphisms in the FGFR4 and Klotho-beta genes may help preselect the subset of patients who will achieve the best clinical response to chenodeoxycholate pharmacotherapy
Major Finding: In women with constipation-predominant IBS (IBS-C), genetic variations in bile acid regulatory genes may determine the therapeutic response to the drug sodium chenodeoxycholate.