biochemistry

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biochemistry

 [bi″o-kem´is-tre]
the chemistry of living organisms and of their chemical constituents and vital processes.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

bi·o·chem·is·try

(bī'ō-kem'is-trē),
The chemistry of living organisms and of the chemical, molecular, and physical changes occurring therein.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

biochemistry

(bī′ō-kĕm′ĭ-strē)
n.
1. The study of the chemical substances and vital processes occurring in living organisms; biological chemistry; physiological chemistry.
2. The chemical composition of a particular living system or biological substance: viral biochemistry.

bi′o·chem′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj. & n.
bi′o·chem′i·cal·ly adv.
bi′o·chem′ist n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

biochemistry

Fringe medicine
A term misused by a German homeopath, WH Schüssler, for the use of “tissue salts” to treat patients with alleged mineral deficiencies.

Chemistry
Physiologic chemistry—the chemistry of living cells, tissues, and organisms.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

bi·o·chem·is·try

(bī'ō-kem'is-trē)
The chemistry of living organisms and of the chemical, molecular, and physical changes occurring therein.
Synonym(s): biologic chemistry, physiologic chemistry.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

biochemistry

The study of the chemical processes going on in living organisms, especially humans. Biochemistry is concerned, among other things, with the acceleration of biochemical processes by ENZYMES; with the chemical messengers of the body (HORMONES); with communication between cells at cell membranes; with the chemical processes which govern cell survival and reproduction; with the production of energy in cells; and with the processes of digestion of food and the way in which the resulting chemical substances are utilized for energy and structural purposes.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

biochemistry

the study of the chemistry of living organisms.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

bi·o·chem·is·try

(bī'ō-kem'is-trē)
The chem-istry of living organisms and of the chemical, molecular, and physical changes occurring therein.
Synonym(s): physiologic chemistry.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Atomic numbers for the five elements most important in the chemistry of life appear in binary form along with the chemical formulas for 12 biologically significant molecules.
"Science has made enormous progress in understanding how the chemistry of life works, but the elegance and complexity of biological systems at the molecular level have paralyzed science's attempt to explain their origins," he says.
"You can think of chlorinated biological compounds as aliens," said environmentalist Barry Commoner, "and like aliens from outer space, the reason they cause problems is that they're readily assimilated into the normal chemistry of life. It's just like the movies." Get it?
The Nobel Museum 2018 is made up of five sections, showcasing the achievements of Nobel laureates in five different areas of chemistry, namely: Chemistry of Life, Chemical Reactions, Elements, Molecules, and Chemistry Changing the World.
It starts with finding liquid water, which is essential for the chemistry of life as we understand it.
Cases are presented along with a list of learning objectives, quantitative reasoning skills and concepts, and questions, and relate to the scientific method, the chemistry of life, the cell, microbiology, genetics, molecular biology, evolution, plant and animal form and function, health, ecology and behavior, and the biosphere and conservation.
As a result, scientists have always assumed that the really complicated chemistry of life must have originated in Earth's early oceans.
Protein degradation; v.1: Ubiquitin and the chemistry of life.
It is a wonder that the building blocks of life, and the chemistry of life, depend on the relatively fragile [C.sup.[alpha]]-H bond remaining intact.

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