chemiosmosis

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chemiosmosis

The movement of ions across a selectively permeable membrane down an electrochemical gradient, usually understood to mean the respiratory chain in mitochondria. As the proton concentration increases in the intermembrane space, a strong electrochemical gradient is established across the inner membrane. The protons can return to the matrix through the ATP synthase complex, and their potential energy is used to synthesise ATP from ADP and inorganic phosphate (Pi).
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

chemiosmosis

see ELECTRON TRANSPORT SYSTEM.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Before the widespread acceptance of the chemiosmotic hypothesis, many biochemists searched for the 'high-energy intermediate' coupling electron transfer to ATP synthesis.
The fascinating histories of Dr Mitchell, the Glynn Research Institute and the chemiosmotic hypothesis have been reported previously [18-20].
A sea of white pins indicated those rejecting the chemiosmotic hypothesis; three red pins (marking the location of the Institute, and of Moscow and Baltimore where Professors Vladimir Skulachev and Andre Jagendorf, respectively, worked) represented those who accepted it.