isotope

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isotope

 [i´so-tōp]
a chemical element having the same atomic number as another (i.e., the same number of nuclear protons), but having a different atomic mass (i.e., a different number of nuclear neutrons).
radioactive isotope radioisotope.
stable isotope one that does not transmute into another element with emission of corpuscular or electromagnetic radiations.

i·so·tope

(ī'sō-tōp), An isotope is identified by its symbol preceded by a superscript numeral showing its mass number (12C). Alternatively the mass number may follow the symbol at the same level (C 12). When the name of the element rather than its symbol is used, the numeral must follow and not precede the name (carbon 12). Do not join the numeral to the symbol or the name with a hyphen. The atomic number of an element (the unvarying number of protons in its nucleus) may be shown by a subscript numeral preceding the symbol 6C).
One of two or more nuclides that are chemically identical, having the same number of protons, yet differ in mass number, because their nuclei contain different numbers of neutrons; individual isotopes are names with the inclusion of their mass number in the superscript position (12C) and the atomic number (nuclear protons in the subscript position (6C). In former usage, the mass numbers follow the chemical symbol (C-12).
[iso- + G. topos, part, place]

isotope

/iso·tope/ (i´so-tōp) a chemical element having the same atomic number as another (i.e., the same number of nuclear protons), but having a different atomic mass (i.e., a different number of nuclear neutrons).

isotope

[ī′sətōp]
Etymology: Gk, isos + topos, place
one of two or more forms of an atom having the same number of protons in the atomic nucleus but different numbers of neutrons and thus a different atomic mass. For example, two common isotopes of carbon are 12C, which has six neutrons, and 14C, which has eight. Many isotopes are used in diagnostic and therapeutic procedures.

isotope

Imaging
An MRI term for atomic nuclei that contain the same number of protons, but differ in the number of neutrons in the nucleus of the atom for the element concerned.

i·so·tope

(ī'sŏ-tōp)
One of two or more nuclides that are chemically identical, having the same number of protons, yet differ in mass number, because their nuclei contain different numbers of neutrons; individual isotopes are named with the inclusion of their mass number in the superior position (12C) and the atomic number (nuclear protons) in the inferior position (6C).
[iso- + G. topos, part, place]

isotope

Chemically identical elements whose atomic nuclei have the same number of protons but different numbers of neutrons. The number of protons determines the number of orbital electrons and hence the chemical properties. Radioactive isotopes are called radionuclides. From the Greek iso -, equal and topos , place. Isotopes occupy the same place in the Periodic table of the elements.

isotope

any of the forms of an element having the same number of protons (atomic number) but a different number of neutrons (atomic mass). Some isotopes of an element may be radioisotopes (e.g. 12C is not radioactive while 14C is) and yet can function normally in biological material. Isotopes can thus be ‘tagged’ (using suitable detection devices such as geiger counters and autoradiography) as biochemical processes occur. See HALF-LIFE, AUTO RADIO GRAPH.

Isotope

An unstable form of an element that gives off radiation to become stable. Elements are characterized by the number of electrons around each atom. One electron's negative charge balances the positive charge of each proton in the nucleus. To keep all those positive charges in the nucleus from repelling each other (like the same poles of magnets), neutrons are added. Only certain numbers of neutrons work. Other numbers cannot hold the nucleus together, so it splits apart, giving off ionizing radiation. Sometimes one of the split products is not stable either, so another split takes place. The process is called radioactivity.

i·so·tope

(ī'sŏ-tōp)
One of two or more nuclides that are chemically identical, having the same number of protons, yet differ in mass number, because their nuclei contain different numbers of neutrons.
[iso- + G. topos, part, place]

isotope (ī´sōtōp),

n one of several nuclides having the same number of protons in their nuclei, and hence having the same atomic number but differing in the number of neutrons, and therefore in the mass number. The isotopes of a particular element have virtually identical chemical properties.
isotope, stable,
n a nonradioactive isotope of an element.

isotope

a chemical element having the same atomic number as another (i.e. the same number of nuclear protons), but having a different atomic mass (i.e. a different number of nuclear neutrons).

radioactive isotope
one having an unstable nucleus and which emits characteristic radiation during its decay to a stable form. See also radioisotope.
stable isotope
one that does not transmute into another element with emission of corpuscular or electromagnetic radiations.
References in periodicals archive ?
In a study, Ohio State University researcher Matthew Saltzman and his colleagues show how plankton provided a critical link between the atmosphere and chemical isotopes stored in rocks 500 million years ago.
The ratios of chemical isotopes enable scientists to identify the annual growth patterns in the tusks of mammoths and mastodons.
However, analyses of chemical isotopes in coral samples show that the reefs experienced similar water temperatures--and there, probably similar nitrate and phosphorus concentrations--without ill effects on several occasions during the past 7,000 years.