bond

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bond

 [bond]
the linkage between atoms or radicals of a chemical compound, or the symbol representing this linkage and indicating the number and attachment of the valencies of an atom in constitutional formulas, represented by a pair of dots or a line between atoms, e.g., H—O—H, H—C≡C—H or H:O:H, H:C:::C:H.
coordinate covalent bond a covalent bond in which one of the bonded atoms furnishes both of the shared electrons.
covalent bond a chemical bond between two atoms or radicals formed by the sharing of a pair (single bond), two pairs (double bond), or three pairs of electrons (triple bond).
disulfide bond a strong covalent bond, —S—S—, important in linking polypeptide chains in proteins, the linkage arising as a result of the oxidation of the sulfhydryl (SH) groups of two molecules of cysteine.
high-energy phosphate bond an energy-rich phosphate linkage present in adenosine triphosphate (ATP), phosphocreatine, and certain other biological molecules. On hydrolysis at pH 7 it yields about 8000 calories per mole, in contrast to the 3000 calories yielded by phosphate esters. The bond stores energy that is used to drive biochemical processes, such as the synthesis of macromolecules, contraction of muscles, and the production of the electrical potentials for nerve conduction.
high-energy sulfur bond an energy-rich sulfur linkage, the most important of which occurs in the acetyl-CoA molecule, the main source of energy in fatty acid biosynthesis.
hydrogen bond a weak, primarily electrostatic, bond between a hydrogen atom bound to a highly electronegative element (such as oxygen or nitrogen) in a given molecule, or part of a molecule, and a second highly electronegative atom in another molecule or in a different part of the same molecule.
ionic bond a chemical bond in which electrons are transferred from one atom to another so that one bears a positive and the other a negative charge, the attraction between these opposite charges forming the bond.
peptide bond the —CO—NH— linkage formed between the carboxyl group of one amino acid and the amino group of another; it is an amide linkage joining amino acids to form peptides.

bond

(bond),
chemistry the force holding two neighboring atoms in place and resisting their separation; a bond is electrovalent if it consists of the attraction between oppositely charged groups, or covalent if it results from the sharing of one, two, or three pairs of electrons by the bonded atoms.
Chemistry A unit of chemical attraction; the ‘glue’ that maintains the molecules in their 3-D configuration—e.g., O2 has 2 bonds of affinity, which may be graphically represented by a short line or dash
Social medicine A binding force or influence; a cause of union; a uniting tie—e.g., bonds of fellowship

bond

(bond)
chemistry The force holding two neighboring atoms in place and resisting their separation; a bond is electrovalent if it consists of the attraction between oppositely charged groups, or covalent if it results from the sharing of one, two, or three pairs of electrons by the bonded atoms.

bond

  1. the force of mutual attraction that holds atoms together in molecules (see VAN DER WAALS INTERACTIONS and SULPHUR BRIDGE), such as high-energy bonds in ATP, weak hydrogen bonds in DNA, PEPTIDE BONDS and the disulphide bond of proteins.
  2. also called pair bond . The attraction which maintains a male/female relationship, for purposes of breeding, during the life cycle of some animals, mainly warmblooded vertebrates.

bond

(bond)
chemistry the force holding two neighboring atoms in place and resisting their separation.
References in periodicals archive ?
Their structural properties have been investigated by neutron and X-ray diffraction measurements and RMC simulation procedures, in which all the possible chemical bonds in the glasses are taken into consideration.
Unfortunately, nitrogen is usually an important atom when forming chemical bonds at lower temperatures.
They said that controlling the size of the area in which hydrogen or other chemical bonds act can lead to significantly enhanced properties for future materials, even when the initial chemical bonds are very weak.
Metal hydrides can undergo a process called reversible chemisorption, allowing them to store and release extra hydrogen held by weak chemical bonds.
"When it comes back to the ground, mercury forms strong chemical bonds with organic material, so it often gets locked away in rich forest soils and in peat," says Merritt R.
When heated to 374 [degrees] F, the new epoxy's chemical bonds begin to break down.
Vulcanization involves the reaction of several ingredients in the recipe to generate chemical bonds between the rubber molecules, forming a network.
Evan Scott Gawlik, 17, of Texas Academy of Mathematics & Science in Denton, who used computational chemistry to investigate what he calls the "exceptions to the rule" that noble gases don't form chemical bonds.
The commercial grades of Alcryn MPR are said to be heavily used in hard/soft composite components and inherently form melt or chemical bonds to rigid substrates, such as PVC and polycarbonate/ABS alloys.
It takes a jolt of energy to get things started-- to break the original chemical bonds. The spark provides this activation energy.
Scientists plan to use quantum CT scans to observe such split-second transformations, during which chemical bonds are broken and formed.
The mast cells of your immune system recognize specific antigens and form chemical bonds with them.