Checking Compulsion

A manifestation of obsessive-compulsive personality disorder, in which a person repeatedly confirms that he or she has done a particular thing—e.g., turned off the coffee pot, washed the bathroom sink, etc.—which appears excessive and abnormal to others
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A child with a checking compulsion may be described as "getting out of his seat" or talking excessively
A similar study design and protocol was conducted by the same authors (Twohig, Hayes, & Masuda, 2006b) on four participants who had various forms of OCD, including checking compulsions, hoarding, and cleaning compulsions.
The factors were: Rituals related to contamination, general checking compulsions, safety checking compulsions, diversion based controlling compulsions, and controlling compulsions with religious connotation.
Amongst three factors specifying yielding compulsions, two were for checking compulsions i.
Common OCD symptoms include contamination and cleaning compulsions, harm-based obsessions and checking compulsions, sexual and aggressive obsessions, perfectionism obsessions and compulsions, religious obsessions, hoarding, and other symptoms such as the constant search for reassurance and repeated questioning which do not fit into the other groupings.
1995; Lopatka & Rachman, 1995; Rachman, 1976, 2002; Rachman & Hodgson, 1980; Rheaume, Ladouceur, Freeston, & Letarte, 1995) have suggested that an exaggerated sense of responsibility for preventing harm may be particularly relevant to individuals with checking compulsions.
Repeated requests for reassurance are common in OCD, particularly among individuals with checking compulsions (Rachman, 2002; Rachman & Hodgson, 1980; Salkovskis, 1985, 1999).
Patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder may hoard items out of fear of contamination or as a result of checking compulsions that are related to past loss or mistakes, she said.
While symmetry, sexual obsessions and checking compulsions and rituals, tended to be more common in male participants, dirt and contamination obsessions and washing compulsions were slightly more common in females.
For example, it was found that symmetry, sexual obsessions, and checking compulsions and rituals, tended to be more common in males, whereas dirt and contamination obsessions and washing compulsions were slightly more common in females.