Charlson comorbidity index

Charlson comorbidity index

(charl′sŏn)
[Mary E. Charlson, contemporary U.S. internist and epidemiologist]
A prognostic tool that estimates the likelihood that a person with particular illnesses will survive for a specified number of years. The index, which takes into account the patient's age and illnesses such as heart, lung, endocrine, kidney, or blood disorders, can also be used to estimate the resource utilization of patients with a variety of chronic diseases.
References in periodicals archive ?
The HCT-CI is an adapted version of the Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI), and was originally developed to predict outcomes in patients undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplant.
Additional analyses of these data showed that the noncompliant patients were more often age 65 or older, women, nonwhite, and had more comorbidities based on having a higher Charlson comorbidity index.
Using CPRS, we collected demographic data including age, sex, race, number of discharge medications, and data to determine the Acute Physiology Score (APS) of the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II [13] and the Charlson Comorbidity Index [14] for use as global measures of illness severity and comorbidity, respectively.
The Charlson Comorbidity Index was originally validated to predict death in breast cancer patients, (48) and has been shown to be correlated with hospital readmission and death among patients with heart failure.
The full geriatric assessment includes the evaluation of Activities or Daily Living, independent or Instrumental Activities of Daily Living, fall history, Mobility-Tiredness questionnaire, the Mini-Mental State Examination, the four-item Geriatric Depression Scale, the Mini Nutritional Assessment, the Charlson Comorbidity Index, and polypharmacy.
Multivariate analysis demonstrated that the SOFA score on day 21 and the Charlson Comorbidity Index were the best predictor of survival for six months after hospital discharge The SOFA score on day 21 and Comorbidity in the ICU appears to be a valuable prognostic indicators in chronically critically ill patients.
The proportion of patients with recorded coexisting conditions (defined by using the Charlson Comorbidity Index score) increased over the study period.
Other co-variates were demographics including age, sex, ethnicity, and education along with the Charlson Comorbidity Index.
Participants also self-administered a questionnaire version of the Charlson Comorbidity Index and the 12-item Duke Activity Status Index questionnaire, used to assess symptom severity and functional status.
45] The Charlson comorbidity index was chosen because it has been validated specifically in studies of cancer patients.