Charles

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Charles

(shahrl),
Jacques, French physicist, 1746-1823. See: Charles law.
References in periodicals archive ?
Occasional factual lapses mar the text, as when Andrea Doria--then six years dead--commands a 1566 galley voyage, or when Charles V's 1555 abdication occurs in 1554 (122, 177).
In the second chapter of the section, author Marie-Helene Tesniere of the Bibliotheque nationale de France asks a simple question as expressed in her title: "Les manuscrits de la Librairie de Charles V ont-ils ete lus ?
Music and Ceremony at the Court of Charles V: The Capilla Flamenca and the Art of Political Promotion.
At several points, de Armas sees Don Quixote as a stand-in for Charles V, "consumed by illness but steeling himself onward, hoping for a miracle" (93), but he is, as evoked in context, the ailing emperor as portrayed by Titian.
The main point in the first five chapters is that Charles V's, the Holy Roman Emperor, anti-French propaganda against the impious collaboration of a Christian king with a Muslim sovereign was so successful that this Imperial view was accepted at face value in the 20th century, even in French historiography.
Emperor's favourite It does have its own award winning brewery though - The Het Anker - which is said to have supplied Holy Roman Emperor Charles V's favourite beer.
His portraits include some of Gossaert's finest work, commissioned by men such as the churchman and administrator Jean Carondelet, the Emperor Charles V's secretary, Francisco de los Cobos y Molina and Henry III, Count of Nassau-Breda, who rebuilt his castle at Breda in the Renaissance style.
The nation state was a terrible idea, whereas Charles V's concept of Christendom, of a European Holy Roman Empire, was a wonderful idea.
Paul Getty Museum's current exhibition, 'Imagining the Past in France, 1250-1500', are several large manuscripts that belonged to the noted bibliophile, King Charles V of France (r.
920) wrote "No matter what the case one should never destroy a book without knowing what is inside it" and in 1510 the Protestant humanist Reuchlin opposed papal exhortations (frequent since 1210) to destroy Jewish doctrinal books by asking "How can we oppose what we do not understand?" In a shocking regression when Charles V's army sacked Rome in 1527 von Burtenbach's troops bedded their horses on the Holy City archival documents.
As Baeza freely admits (to the point of putting penguins on the sections), it recalls the radical, carousel swirls of Tecton's famous London zoo enclosure, but its proportions also have a more historic lineage, based on Charles V's 16th-century palace at the nearby Alhambra, a robust Italianate palazzo with a circular colonnaded courtyard.