Charles

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Charles

(shahrl),
Jacques, French physicist, 1746-1823. See: Charles law.
References in periodicals archive ?
Pressed by the Long Parliament, Charles I allowed his leading Protestant Irish supporter James Butler, marquis of Ormond, to negotiate a tenuous cessation of arms with the Catholic Confederacy.
Unlike his father James I, Charles I was not given to committing to writing his thoughts on the English Constitution or any other subjects.
He was a dedicated Puritan, one who strongly supported Oliver Cromwell in the parliamentary struggle against King Charles I.
The blackened wood panelling disguised two of the three exits from the room and my mind buzzed as I visualised images of hurried escapes, hidden mistresses and duplicitous dealings as Charles I conferred with his confidants back in about 1644.
Further chapters also pursue interpretation of the public image of the martyred Charles I, especially Milton's acknowledgement that Charles and his supporters used the power of the imagination as a key to political authority (p.
No one familiar with the recent historiography of the early Stuart church would be surprised to find countless conformists expressing this anti-Puritan attitude after Charles I came to the throne in 1625 and raised William Laud and his friends to power.
Cultural Aesthetics describes the last days of Charles I, following his trial in Westminster Hall, that ended with his execution on a cold morning on 30 January 1649 on the scaffold specially erected in front of the Banqueting House in Whitehall.
Michael's Mount, where he was liberated by Sir Thomas Fairfax's troops (April 23, 1646); gained control of the Scottish parliament and persuaded the Scots to intervene in England after the army seized Charles I (June 1647-March 1648); taking charge of the campaign, he led a large but inexperienced army into England (July 8, 1648) and was defeated in detail by Cromwell near Preston (August 17-18); captured near Uttoxeter (August 25), he was held at Windsor Castle; tried in February 1649, he was condemned to death (March 6) and executed at Windsor (March 9).
Otherwise, the East Gallery paintings were all products of Van Dyck's London years (1632-41), beginning with the 1632 double portrait of Charles I and his French queen Henrietta Maria (lent from Kromefiz in the Czech Republic).
The Introduction outlines the ways in which visual materials, literary texts, cookery books, and political writings are used as political propaganda in representations of Charles I and Henrietta Maria, Oliver and Elizabeth Cromwell, and in the characterizations of Adam and Eve in John Milton's Paradise Lost.
He decided to specialise and set himself the challenge of acquiring a silver coin or coins from the reign of every English monarch from King Athelstan ( 925-939) and Charles I (1625-1649).
In her article of 50 years ago, Veronica Wedgwood focused on a moment in 1629 when one of the greatest artists of Europe, the Flemish painter Peter Paul Rubens, was sent by Philip IV of Spain on a diplomatic mission to Charles I.