Carrier

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carrier

 [kar´e-er]
1. an individual who harbors the specific organisms of a disease without manifest symptoms and is capable of transmitting the infection; the condition of such an individual is referred to as the carrier state.
2. in genetics, an individual who is heterozygous for a recessive gene and thus does not express the recessive phenotype but can transmit it to offspring. Only females can be carriers of X-linked recessive traits.
3. a substance that carries a radioisotopic or other label, as in a tracer study. A second isotope mixed with a particular isotope is also referred to as a carrier. See also carrier-free.
4. a transport protein that carries specific substances, e.g., in the blood or across cell membranes.
5. in immunology, a macromolecular substance to which a hapten is coupled in order to produce an immune response against the hapten. immune responses are usually produced only against large molecules capable of simultaneously binding both B cells and helper T cells.

car·ri·er

(ka'rē-er),
1. A person who or animal that harbors a specific infectious agent in the absence of discernible clinical disease and serves as a potential source of infection.
See also: label, tracer.
2. Any chemical capable of accepting an atom, radical, or subatomic particle from one compound, then passing it to another; for example, cytochromes are electron carriers; homocysteine is a methyl carrier.
See also: label, tracer.
3. A substance that, by having chemical properties closely related to or indistinguishable from those of a radioactive tracer, is thus able to carry the tracer through a precipitation or similar chemical procedure; the best carriers are the nonradioactive isotopes of the tracer in question.
See also: label, tracer.
4. A large immunogen (usually a protein) that, when coupled to a hapten, facilitates an immune response to the hapten.
5. A component of a membrane that causes the transfer of a substance from one side of the membrane to the other.
6. The mobile phase in chromatography.
7. A component of a biologic fluid that binds a ligand and transports that ligand to a ne wlocation.

carrier

(kăr′ē-ər)
n.
1. A mechanism or device by which something is conveyed or conducted.
2. Medicine A person or animal that shows no symptoms of a disease but harbors the infectious agent of that disease and is capable of transmitting it to others.
3. Genetics An individual that carries one gene for a particular recessive trait. A carrier does not express the trait but, when mated with another carrier, can produce offspring that do.
4. An insurance or underwriting organization.
An individual who possesses one copy of a mutant allele that causes disease only when 2 copies are present; carriers are not affected by the disease. The mating of 2 carriers can result in a child who has a disease that follows simple mendelian genetics

carrier

Epidemiology A person or animal without apparent disease who harbors a specific pathogen can transmit it to others; the carrier state may occur in a person with an asymptomatic infection–asymptomatic carrier, or during the incubation period, convalescence, and postconvalescence of a person with clinically recognizable disease; the carrier state may be of
short or long duration–transient or chronic. See Latent carrier, Silent carrier Genetics A state in which a person has a gene known to be linked to a particular condition, who does not manifest the disease; in humans the classic carrier state is that of a ♀ with a defective gene on the X chromosome, which does not manifest itself in ♀ with 2 X chromosomes–one of which is presumed to be normal–for a particular condition Infectious disease A person infected with a bug, who can act as a 'vector' and transmit the infection to others but is asymptomatic Types Silent carriers–eg with TB, retain infectiousness; latent carriers–eg those with HSV are not infectious. See Typhoid Mary Managed care
1. An organization–eg, an insurance company, with an HCFA contract to administer claims processing and make Medicare payments to health care providers for Medicare Part B benefits. See Fiscal Intermediary, Part B.
2. A private contractor that administers claims processing and payment for Medicare Part B services. See Supplementary Medical Insurance Obstetrics A surrogate mother who is carrying a gestational product to term. See Gestational carrier Pharmacology A peptide, protein, or other substance that binds to a therapeutic agent, and transports it in the circulation. See Vehicle.

car·ri·er

(kar'ē-ĕr)
1. A person or animal harboring a specific infectious agent in the absence of clinical disease symptoms and serving as a potential source of infection.
2. Any chemical capable of accepting an atom, radical, or subatomic particle from one compound, then passing it to another.
3. A substance that, by having chemical properties closely related to or indistinguishable from those of a radioactive tracer, is able to carry the tracer through a precipitation or similar chemical procedure.
See also: label, tracer
4. A large immunogen that when coupled to a hapten facilitates an immune response to the hapten.
5. In the U.S., a private health care insurance company that has a contract with Medicare to pay Medicare part B claims.
6. A business entity that provides health care benefits to individuals or other businesses.

carrier

1. A person permanently or temporarily immune to a disease-producing organism (pathogen) which is present in his or her body, and which can be passed on, directly or indirectly, to others. A person who carries infectious organisms without ever having suffered the disease is known as a ‘casual carrier’.
2. A person with one normal and one affected gene (heterozygous) for a condition which is expressed only if both genes bear the defect for the condition (recessive inheritance). Such a person does not show the condition but can pass on the gene to an offspring who could inherit the other gene from the other parent.
3. Any molecule that, by attaching itself to a non-immunogenic molecule, can provide EPITOPES for helper T cells thus making the second molecule immunogenic. See also TYPHOID CARRIER.

carrier

  1. an individual plant or animal that is infected with pathogenic organisms internally or externally without showing signs of disease, and which is capable of transferring them to others, thus causing disease. For example, typhoid carriers harbour bacteria in the gall bladder and these enter the gut in the bile and are excreted.
  2. an individual with a GENOTYPE containing a deleterious recessive gene such as that for PHENYLKETONURIA, that does not show in the PHENOTYPE.

Carrier

A person who has a genetic defect but does not develop any symptoms or signs of the defect. The carrier's offspring may inherit the defect and develop the associated disorder.

car·ri·er

(kar'ē-ĕr)
Being that harbors a specific infectious agent in the absence of discernible clinical disease and serves as a potential source of infection.
References in periodicals archive ?
Electrical sheet resistance, conductivity, Hall mobility of charge carriers and charge carrier concentration of the PEDOT:PSS film deposited on the glass substrate.
This suggests that the conditions that were described in Koster's group 1D model [17] that were also assumed in the 2-dimensional numerical simulations of a similar OSC with perfect planar contacts are closely mimicking the electronics, kinetics, and charge carrier transfer interfaces in actual structures of BHJ OSC systems.
Suppose that a valid physical reason allows a charge carrier to move as a free particle in the lattice, regardless of the concentration gradient or applied potential difference or force F of any physical nature; in this extreme case, the condition [[rho].sup.eff] [right arrow] 0 necessarily results by consequence and requires itself straightforwardly [D.sup.[section]] [right arrow] to in the Nernst-Einstein equation.
It should be noted that as indicated in the above, even when the bias voltage is large to make the depletion region of the spacer possess low conductivity, the charge carriers in the other part of the spacer are not depleted, and the maximum absorption can not reach 100%.
The deposition of the PEPC layer leads to the most significant decrease in photovoltage in the range 2.0-3.2 eV due to the increase of the rate of trapping and surface recombination of charge carriers near the PEPC/CIS interface.
The increase of the absorbance due to the increase of charge carriers in the nanocomposite [6].
where e is the quantum of electric charge, n is the number of charge carriers per unit of volume, [tau] is the average time between collisions and M is the mass of the charge carriers.
The interpenetrating networks with appropriate phase sizes can provide a favorable interface for exciton dissociation and pathways for charge carrier transport without too many chances of recombination during the transit processes [16, 22].
Among the topics are transparent conducting thin films for OLEDs, iridium and platinum complexes for OLEDs, phosphorescent OLEDs for solid-state lighting, charge carrier mobility in amorphous organic semiconductors, modeling light extraction from OLEDs, printing techniques for fabricating OLEDs, fluorenone defects in fluorene-based conjugate polymers, the technology and manufacturing of polymer OLED on complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) microdisplays, OLED-based biochemical sensors, large-area OLED lighting panels and their applications, and a procedure for determining the lifetime of OLED lighting panels and a proposal for standardization.
"By combining the established molecular design principle with a polymer that has a very good intrinsic charge carrier mobility, we believe it will make a huge difference in organic electronics," Kim said.
As a consequence, when theme an free path of carriers is comparable with smaller crystalline sizes, D, and critical thickness, d, the charge carrier mobility, [mu], could be limited according to microstructure data of Table 1 for [Fe.sub.2][O.sub.3] thin-films.