Chargaff


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Char·gaff

(shar-gahf'),
Erwin, Austrian-U.S. biochemist, 1905-2002. See: Chargaff rule.
References in periodicals archive ?
(12) Erwin Chargaff, Voices in the Labyrinth: Nature, Man, and Science, A Continuum Book (New York: Seabury Press, 1977), p.
(18) Chargaff, E, E Vischer, R Doniger, et al, 'The composition of the desoxypentose nucleic acids of thymus and spleen', Journal of Biological Chemistry, vol.
Watson (now 23, became a research fellow at Cambridge) and Crick (now 35, and a graduate student there) had admired the work of Linus Pauling who had discovered in 1948 "that many proteins take the shape of an alpha helix, spiraled like a spring coil." (8) They were also aware of the studies of Erwin Chargaff, a biochemist, who, in 1951, announced that "the arrangement of nitrogen bases in DNA varied widely, but the amount of certain bases always occurred in a one-to-one ratio.
Erwin Chargaff, biochemist and the father of molecular biology
La biologia, que a mediados de siglo, con Erwin Schrodinger y Erwin Chargaff, veia la substancia genetica como un texto, ya considera que el DNA consiste en codigos digitales, como el biologo Richard Dawkins, entre otros, no ha dejado de decir desde hace varias decadas.
As Erwin Chargaff, one of the pioneers of nucleic acid studies has said, "Models in science are necessary as clothes hangers on which ideas and theories can be hung up." (18) Indeed, everyone knows James Watson's description of how he and Francis Crick discovered the structure of DNA through modeling.
(36) Chargaff es una de las mentes mas lucidas del siglo XX en torno a las implicaciones de la manipulacion genetica, quien ademas se manifesto en contra de la misma.
In their new book, Newberg and d'Aquili quote biologist Edwin Chargaff, who thinks all real scientists are driven by the mysterious intuition that something immense and unknowable dwells in the material world.
Or will Chargaff's devil's doctrine of "what can be done must be done" dominate the technology and inevitably lead to profound moral abuse?[4]
The Austrian-born American biochemist Erwin Chargaff (b.
But as Erwin Chargaff remarks about the "Ethical Guidelines for Reproductive Technology" adopted by the American Fertility Society, "a gardening manual written by the goatiest of goats could not be more permissive."(5) Moral considerations do not seem to pose much of an obstacle to the spread of market values.