Charcot-Leyden crystal


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Related to Charcot-Leyden crystal: Charcot triad, asthma crystals

Charcot-Leyden crystal

(shăr-kō′lī′dĕn)
[Charcot; Ernest V. von Leyden, Ger. physician, 1832–1910]
A type of colorless, hexagonal, double-pointed, often needle-like crystal found in the sputum in asthma and bronchial bronchitis or in the feces in ulceration of the intestine, esp. amebiasis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Peters-Kennedy, "Charcot-Leyden crystals: do they exist in veterinary species?
Charcot-Leyden crystals (CLCs) are accepted as a morphologic hallmark of eosinophil-related disease in which there is active eosinophilic inflammation or proliferation.
Formation of Charcot-Leyden crystals in human eosinophils and basophils and study of the composition of isolated crystals.
Acute granulocytic leukemia may contain a variety of intracellular inclusions, including Auer rods, hexagonal or light green crystals, pseudo--Chediak-Higashi granules, Charcot-Leyden crystals, and other unclassified inclusions.
The persistence of symptoms, required taking a second sample where isolating the fungus and visualizing fungal structures in the direct examination and the histopathology permitted establishing the diagnosis ofnon-invasive fungal sinusitis since allergic mucin with Charcot-Leyden crystals were not observed, nor significant eosinophilia, or tissue or vascular invasion (4).
Charcot-Leyden crystals consist of a 13 000-molecular weight acidic protein whose amino acid composition distinguished it from the 9300-molecular weight major basic protein, the principal constituent of eosinophil large granules; this protein is identical to lysophospholipase (3) and is stained by basic fuchsin in the Ziehl-Neelsen method.
(5) They described this a s allergic mucin, which consisted of degenerating eosinophils, desquamated respiratory epithelial cells, and Charcot-Leyden crystals. Fungal stains revealed fungal hyphae but no evidence of tissue invasion.
Inflammatory casts contain fibrin, eosinophils, and Charcot-Leyden crystals; noninflammatory casts contain mucin and exhibit vascular hydrostatic changes.
New observations include Charcot-Leyden crystals (Figure 4) and association with celiac disease, lupus anticoagulant, and new viral and bacterial infectious agents.

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