ISDN

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ISDN

Integrated services digital network. A long-obsolete digital telecommunications line with a data (text, graphics, video and audio) throughput of up to 128 kps.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

ISDN

Integrated services digital network Informatics A digital telecommunications line with a data–text, graphics, video and audio–throughput of up to 128 kps. See Internet, Local area network, Modem.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
[11] Shaunak Joshi, Przemyslaw Pawelczak, Danijela Cabric, et al., "When channel bonding is beneficial for opportunistic spectrum access networks," IEEE Transactions on Wireless Communications, vol.
* HtBw: To analyze the effect of channel bonding on the throughput, this parameter is set to 20MHz or 40 MHz.
Channel bonding is a technique for aggregating multiple downstream channels into a cumulative flow, in efforts to support higher access speeds by wideband cable modems.
- AC1750 WiFi Cable Modem Router (C6300) with 16x4 channel bonding has a U.S.
The STi7141 also supports DOCSIS 3.0 downstream channel bonding, which enables download speeds up to 120 Mb/s.
If you follow the high-tech press and prognostications, you encounter buzzwords like ATM, ADSL, channel bonding, DSL "lite", HDSL, ISDN, xDSL, and more.
Mediacom Communications Corporation is among the first cable operators to deploy the Hitron Gigabit Cable Modem (CDA3-35), the industry's first DOCSIS 3.0 32x8 channel bonding modem to be commercially deployed in North America.
DOCSIS 3.0 reportedly enables faster speeds through technology advances such as channel bonding.
These tests were conducted over a live network with the DOCSIS 3.0 ARRIS C4 CMTS with downstream channel bonding and Touchstone data modems, all of which are commercially available today.
IPTV operators are using fibre in high-competition markets and advanced DSL such as channel bonding and VDSL2 in other--less competitive--markets.
* Channel Bonding: Extending the bandwidth by bonding two adjacent 20 MHz channels into a single 40 MHz channel.