Chan Su

Chan Su

Pseudomedicine
A purported aphrodisiac prepared from toad venom, which contains cardioactive bufadienolides; those ingesting these substances are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease or death, as bufadienolides may cause a clinical picture reminiscent of digoxin toxicity. In the event of overdose, these patients appear to respond to digoxin Fab fragments.
References in periodicals archive ?
Three minutes later, it was South China's turn to carve out an opportunity on the set piece with Chan Su Ki firing wide at the near post off a corner.
Chan Su, a traditional Chinese medicine prepared from the dried white secretion of auricular glands and skin glands of Chinese toads (Bufo melanostictus Schneider or Bufo bufo gargarizans Cantor) [1], has attracted the attention of many clinicians due to its diverse biological activities, such as cardiotonic and antitumor [2, 3].
Although the pharmacological profile of Chan Su has been extensively characterized, research on Chan Su has mainly focused on its toxicity.
As a major steroid compound isolated from Chan Su, CBG has been reported by some to exert its pharmacological effects on voltage-gated potassium ([K.sup.+]) channels in primary cultures of rat hippocampus neurons [16].
Chung, "Cyto-/genotoxic effects of the ethanol extract of Chan Su, a traditional Chinese medicine, in human cancer cell lines," Journal of Ethnopharmacology, vol.
Effect of the traditional Chinese medicines Chan Su, Lu-Shen-Wan, Dan Shen, and Asian ginseng on serum digoxin measurement by Tina-quant (Roche) and Synchron LX system (Beckman) digoxin immunoassays.
Effect of Chinese medicines Chan Su and Danshen on EMIT 2000 and Randox digoxin immunoassays: wide variation in digoxin-like immunoreactivity and magnitude of interference in digoxin measurement by different brands of the same product.
Because Chan Su - a traditional Chinese medication used as a topical anesthetic and cardiac medication - also contains bufadienolides (1), samples of Chan Su were obtained for comparative analysis from an importing company in New York City.
Cardiac steriods are found in other nontraditional therapies such as Chan Su and teas made from oleander (Nerium oleander) and foxglove (Digitalis purpureau).