chamomile

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cham·o·mile

(kam'ō-mīl),
The flowering heads of Anthemis nobilis (family Compositae); a stomachic.
Synonym(s): camomile
[G. chamaimēlon, chamomile, fr. chamai, on the ground, + mēlon, apple]

chamomile

Ayurvedic medicine
Chamomile has been used for women’s complaints, indigestion and colicky children.

Herbal medicine
An annual herb, the flowers of which contain choline, coumarins (e.g., umbelliferone), cyanogenic glycosides, flavonoids (e.g., rutin), salicylate derivatives, tannins and volatile oils (e.g., bisabolol and chamazulene). Chamomile is administered as a tea, extract, tincture or ointment. German chamomile tea is analgesic, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, antispasmodic, anxiolytic, carminative, expectorant and sedative; it has been used to treat acne, anxiety, asthma, bacterial and fungal infections, colicky infants, diarrhoea, flatulence, gout, headaches, indigestion, insomnia, irritable bowel, menstrual cramping, pruritus, rheumatic disease and sciatica. In Russia, Roman chamomile is used for colds, gastric complaints, colitis, as a sedative gargle, and topically for eczema and inflammation.

Most herbalists use German chamomile and Roman chamomile interchangeably.
 
Homeopathy
See Chamomilla.
  
Pseudomedicine
An essence in the pseudoscience of flower therapy which is believed to balance emotions, calm nerves and brighten moods.

cham·o·mile

, camomile (kam'ŏ-mīl)
(Matricaria) Herbal agent used in infusions for stomach disorders; alleged to induce sleep; some topical use reported; danger in pregnant women due to abortifacient properties.
[G. chamaimēlon, chamomile, fr. chamai, on the ground, + mēlon, apple]

chamomile

A drug used in ointments for the treatment of nappy rash, chapped skin or sore nipples. A brand name is Kamillosan.
References in periodicals archive ?
Determination of the antibacterial activity of chamomile flower extract: The antibacterial activity of the chamomile flower extract (CFE) was determined based on the inhibition zones using the disc diffusion method of Bauer et al.,(1996).
In fact, dried chamomile flowers (Matricaria recutita) were used as far back as Roman times for their calming effects.
Actress Rosie Perez shares her best trick for catching z's: "My sister, who's a chef, taught me how to make tea with dried chamomile flowers by letting them steep for an entire day.
Hops external remedy an infusion of Hops is much in demand in combination with chamomile flowers or poppy heads as a fomentation for swelling of a painful nature inflammation neuralgic and rheumatic pains bruises boils and gatherings.
To harvest herbs for their flowers--such as chamomile flowers or thyme spikes--snip flower buds off the plants close to the first day the buds open.
"Nettles and mint hung drying in the attic alongside bunches of chamomile flowers and poppy-seed husks," she writes.
Comparison of Kamillosan (TM) cream (2 g ethanolic extract from chamomile flowers in 100 g cream) versus steroidal (0.25% hydrocortisone, 0.75% fluocortin butyl ester) and non-steroidal (5% bufexamac) dermatics in the maintenance therapy of eczema.
over a spoonful of dried chamomile flowers and let it brew for a few minutes before straining it into a cup.
To make the tea, pour boiling water over a spoonful of dried chamomile flowers and let it brew for a few minutes before straining it into a cup.
The development of the chamomile flowers includes 3 steps:
The main constituents of chamomile flowers include several phenolic compounds, primarily the flavonoids, apigenin, quercetin, patuletin, luteolin and their glucosides.