chamomile

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cham·o·mile

(kam'ō-mīl),
The flowering heads of Anthemis nobilis (family Compositae); a stomachic.
Synonym(s): camomile
[G. chamaimēlon, chamomile, fr. chamai, on the ground, + mēlon, apple]

chamomile

/cham·o·mile/ (kam´o-mēl) ( -mīl) German chamomile; the dried flower heads of the herb Matricaria recutita, used for inflammatory diseases of the gastrointestinal tract and as a topical counterirritant and antiinflammatory.
English chamomile , Roman chamomile the dried flowers of the perennial herb Chamaemelum nobile, used as a homeopathic preparation and in folk medicine as a carminative and counterirritant.

chamomile

[kam′əmēl]
an herb with both annual and perennial forms, native to Germany, Hungary, and other areas of Europe.
uses It is used externally as an antiseptic and soothing agent for inflamed skin and minor wounds. Internally, it is used as an antispasmodic, gas-relieving, and antiinflammatory agent for the treatment of digestive problems; as a light sleep aid and sedative for adults and children; and as a possible anticancer agent. It is likely safe when used in medicinal amounts for a short term.
contraindications It should not be used during pregnancy (Chamaemelum nobile) and lactation; it may be used in children. Cross-hypersensitivity may result from allergy to sunflowers, ragweed, or members of the aster family (echinacea, feverfew, milk thistle). People with asthma should also avoid its use.

chamomile

Ayurvedic medicine
Chamomile has been used for women’s complaints, indigestion and colicky children.

Herbal medicine
An annual herb, the flowers of which contain choline, coumarins (e.g., umbelliferone), cyanogenic glycosides, flavonoids (e.g., rutin), salicylate derivatives, tannins and volatile oils (e.g., bisabolol and chamazulene). Chamomile is administered as a tea, extract, tincture or ointment. German chamomile tea is analgesic, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, antispasmodic, anxiolytic, carminative, expectorant and sedative; it has been used to treat acne, anxiety, asthma, bacterial and fungal infections, colicky infants, diarrhoea, flatulence, gout, headaches, indigestion, insomnia, irritable bowel, menstrual cramping, pruritus, rheumatic disease and sciatica. In Russia, Roman chamomile is used for colds, gastric complaints, colitis, as a sedative gargle, and topically for eczema and inflammation.

Most herbalists use German chamomile and Roman chamomile interchangeably.
 
Homeopathy
See Chamomilla.
  
Pseudomedicine
An essence in the pseudoscience of flower therapy which is believed to balance emotions, calm nerves and brighten moods.

cham·o·mile

, camomile (kam'ŏ-mīl)
(Matricaria) Herbal agent used in infusions for stomach disorders; alleged to induce sleep; some topical use reported; danger in pregnant women due to abortifacient properties.
[G. chamaimēlon, chamomile, fr. chamai, on the ground, + mēlon, apple]

chamomile

A drug used in ointments for the treatment of nappy rash, chapped skin or sore nipples. A brand name is Kamillosan.

chamomile,

n Latin names:
Matricaria chamomilla, Matricaria recutita, Chamaemelum nobile, Anthemis nobile; part used: buds (dried); uses: antiinflammatory, digestive aid, irritable bowel syndrome, colon disease, Crohn's disease, insomnia, anxiety, spasms, wound healing; precautions: pregnancy, lactation, patients with asthma, hypersensitivity to sunflowers, ragweed, or aster family, can cause burning of the face, eyes, or mucosa, liver disease. Also called
common chamomile, English chamomile, German chamomile, Hungarian chamomile, Roman chamomile, sweet false chamomile, true chamomile, or
wild chamomile.
chamomile, Roman (rōˑ·mn kaˑ·m·mēl),
n a colorless to light blue oil that turns yellow upon storage. Commonly used as an antispasmodic; the herb from which it is derived is used to dispel gas and relieve colic. See also Chamaemelum nobile.
Enlarge picture
Chamomile.

chamomile, camomile

derived from flowerheads of two species of Compositae; used for its anti-inflammatory and antiseborrheic activity, usually topically but also administered orally as a tea for indigestion and in the treatment of calf scours.
References in periodicals archive ?
Determination of total antioxidant capacity and total phenolic content of the extract: The total antioxidant activity of chamomile flower extract (CFE) was determined using the phosphomolybdenum method according to the procedure described by Prieto et al.
over a spoonful of dried chamomile flowers and let it brew for a few minutes before straining it into a cup.
To make the tea, pour boiling water over a spoonful of dried chamomile flowers and let it brew for a few minutes before straining it into a cup.
The development of the chamomile flowers includes 3 steps:
In traditional medicine, chamomile flowers are used as an anti-spasmolytic and anti-inflammatory tea for stomach disorders.
Flies and yellow jackets buzzed a couple stuffing chamomile flowers into a soggy section of small intestine.
HERBS: Chamomile flowers look like tiny suns and represent Solar Fire.
Magic Hat reports that Braggot is made with 25% foor-malted Maris Otter pale malt, and 25% Canadian malted wheat, with Columbus hops, whole chamomile flowers and 600 pounds of wildflower honey (representing 50% of the total fermentable sugars).
To use, steep the chamomile flowers for fifteen minutes, and drink between meals the same as peppermint.