Chagas disease

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South A·mer·i·can try·pan·o·so·mi·a·sis

trypanosomiasis caused by Trypanosoma (or Schizotrypanum) cruzi and transmitted by certain species of reduviid (triatomine) bugs. In its acute form, it is seen most frequently in young children, with swelling of the skin at the site of entry, most often the face, and regional lymph node enlargement; in its chronic form it can assume several aspects, commonly cardiomyopathy, but megacolon and megaesophagus also occur; natural reservoirs include dogs, armadillos, rodents, and other domestic, domiciliated, and wild mammals.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

South A·mer·i·can try·pan·o·so·mi·a·sis

(sowth ă-mer'i-kăn trī-pan'ō-sŏ-mī'ă-sis)
Disease caused by Trypanosoma (or Schizotrypanum) cruzi and transmitted by some species of reduviid (triatomine) bugs. In its acute form, it is seen most frequently in young children, with swelling of the skin at the site of entry, most often the face, and regional lymph node enlargement; in its chronic form it can assume several aspects, commonly cardiomyopathy, but megacolon and megaesophagus also occur; natural reservoirs include domestic, domiciliated, and wild mammals.
Synonym(s): Chagas disease, Chagas-Cruz disease, Cruz trypanosomiasis.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Chagas disease

(shag'as)
[Carlos Ribeiro Justiniano Chagas, Brazilian physician, 1879–1934]
A bloodborne disease caused by Trypanosoma cruzi and transmitted by the biting of a reduviid bug. It is characterized by fever, lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, and facial edema. Chronic cases may be mild or asymptomatic, or may be accompanied by myocarditis, cardiomyopathy, megaesophagus, megacolon, or death.

Etiology

Chagas disease may be transmitted from person-to-person by needlestick injury, transfusion, organ donation, or during childbirth.

Synonym: American trypanosomiasis; South American trypanosomiasis See: Trypanosoma cruzi
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners

Chagas,

Carlos J.R., Brazilian physician and parasitologist, 1879-1934.
Chagas disease - parasitic infection transmitted by certain species of reduviid (triatomine) bugs. Synonym(s): Chagas-Cruz disease; Chagas-Mazza disease; Cruz trypanosomiasis; South American trypanosomiasis
Chagas-Cruz disease - Synonym(s): Chagas disease
Chagas-Mazza disease - Synonym(s): Chagas disease

Mazza,

Salvador, Argentinian physician, 1886-1946.
Chagas-Mazza disease - Synonym(s): Chagas disease
Medical Eponyms © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
cruzi-infected mice and may not fully recapitulate the pathophysiology of Chagas cardiomyopathy, which takes place several years after infection and may not be associated with parasitemia or myocardial parasite infiltration.
To all statistical analysis were considered the following groups: all Chagas disease patients (CD), chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy patients (CCC), without Chagas cardiomyopathy patients (without CCC), chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy patients with LVSD (with LVSD), chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy patients without LVSD (without LVSD), patients with mild to moderate LVSD (Mild/moderate LVSD), and patients with severe LVSD (severe LVSD).
Chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy (CCM) most commonly presents as conduction system abnormalities, dilated cardiomyopathy, and apical aneurysms with consequent thrombus formation and embolization [7].
Heart Conduction Disturbances in Chagas Cardiomyopathy and Its Relation to RV Function
Several cardiovascular signaling routes have been shown to participate in the pathophysiology of Chagas cardiomyopathy (Huang et al., 2003; Rigazio et al., 2014).
Meymandi, whose earlier research established that Chagas cardiomyopathy carries significantly higher morbidity and mortality than does non-Chagas cardiomyopathy (Circulation.
As a rule, after a latent phase lasting 10-20 years, chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy develops and manifest as a heart failure [2].
Furthermore, patients with known Chagas cardiomyopathy and/or megacolon who were hospitalized for routine checks or for elective pacemaker implantation or colon surgery were also enrolled in groups CM and M.
Spray et al., "Developments in the management of Chagas cardiomyopathy," Expert Review of Cardiovascular Therapy, vol.
Adenosine induces ventricular arrythmias in hearts with chronic chagas cardiomyopathy. RevEsp Cardiol 2010; 63:478-482.