Cestoda

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Related to Cestodes: Trematodes

Cestoda

 [ses-to´dah]
a subclass of Cestoidea comprising the true tapeworms, which have a head (scolex) and segments (proglottids). The adults are endoparasitic in the alimentary tract and associated ducts of various vertebrate hosts; their larvae may be found in various organs and tissues.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

Ces·to·da

(ses-tō'dă),
A subclass of tapeworms (class Cestoidea), containing the typical members of this group, including the segmented tapeworms that parasitize humans and domestic animals.
Synonym(s): Eucestoda
[G. kestos, girdle]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

Ces·to·da

(ses-tō'dă)
A class of the flatworm phylum Platyhelminthes. There are two subclasses, Cestodaria and Eucestoda. The latter are the segmented tapeworms that parasitize humans and domestic animals.
[G. kestos, girdle]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Cestoda

a phylum of the Platyhelminthes containing the parasitic tapeworms, the adults of which are intestinal parasites of vertebrates. They have complex LIFE CYCLES usually involving intermediate hosts that are preyed upon by the primary host which thus becomes infected.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Of the 958 cestode samples we examined, 825 (526 proglottid and 299 egg, 86.1%) were D.
This cestode parasite is also present in variable distribution in human population of Pakistan, such as: Bahawalpur 1.1% (Farooqi, 1964), Peshawar 2.1% (Farooqi, 1965), Karachi 1.6% (Haleem et al., 1965) and 2.32% (Bilqees et al., 1982), 1.5% in Hazara Division in Hospital samples, 2.5% in University students in Faisalabad and 3.3% in Diarrhea patients in Karachi (Baqai and Zuberi, 1986).
A total of nine helminth species were found during the present investigation, where Nematodes were at the highest rate as compared to that of trematodes and cestodes. Among the nematodes the prevalence of Trichuris was maximum (5.22%), followed by Trichostrongylus, Haemonchus, Ostertagia and Strongyloides (2.39%) being the lowest.
In present investigations on the prevalence of helminthes studied that the commonness and parasitic load of cestodes was found more common than the nematodes in the intestine of pigeon (Columba livia).
The GIT helminthes were further categorized into nematodes, cestodes and trematodes and their respective prevalence in goats and sheep was determined.
Owing to high prevalence of multiple infections (nematodes, cestodes, trematodes, protozoa) in the Afghan community, it seems that a mass deworming campaign with single-dose chemotherapy (albendazole 400 mg or mebendazole 500 mg) may prove ineffective in eradicating intestinal parasites in the local population.
all ciliates, cestodes, nematodes, prokaryotic inclusions, trematode metacercariae, copepods, xenomas, pinnotherid crabs, and other unidentified organisms; and for dreissenid taxa, nematodes, trematode metacercariae, and other unidentified organisms.
Trematodes and cestodes were most abundant and therefore the seven species in these two groups were used in our community analyses to summarize species richness, total parasites, and the mean number of parasites per host.
Also known as 'cestodes', these parasites are flat, segmented worms that live in the small intestine of cats.
These species harbor an important richness and abundance of nematodes and trematodes, with cestodes and acanthocephalans being uncommon (Guillen-Hernandez et al., 2000; Goldberg et al., 2001; Goldberg and Bursey, 2002; Goldberg et al., 2002; Martinez-Salazar et al., 2013).