caesarean

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caesarean

(sĭ-zâr′ē-ən)
adj. & n.
Variant of cesarean.

cesarean

, Cesarean, caesarean, Caesarean, caesarian, Caesarian, cesarian, Cesarian (si-zar′ē-ăn, -zer′) [Fr the legend that such an operation was performed for the birth of Julius Caesar]
1. Pert. to a cesarean section.
2. A cesarean section. Cesarean is the most common spelling variant in the U.S. Both the capitalized and uncapitalized forms are acceptable. Writers should be consistent with whatever form they prefer.

caesarean

cesarean.
References in periodicals archive ?
Gentle cesareans have also been a selling point for the Brigham, Dr.
Dubai -- The number of pregnant women with a previous cesarean section (C.
Her first cesarean section was done for Cephalopelvic Disproportion (CPD).
Earlier studies have consistently found that cesarean delivery is the most important risk factor for placenta accreta in a subsequent pregnancy, with the risk rising with the number of prior cesarean deliveries.
Unfortunately, women too often decide to have a cesarean without knowing the risks of major abdominal surgery or its postoperative effects.
Recently, you may have read news articles stating that cesarean sections pose no extra risk to women who are giving birth, (1) or that "it may be reasonable for many women to deliver by caesarean section even without a medical need.
To assess the association between cesarean delivery and stillbirth in subsequent pregnancy, the researchers examined the records of women who had had two consecutive singleton births at 20 or more weeks of gestation; infants with congenital abnormalities were excluded.
Results: There were 1,844 elective and 2,993 nonelective cesarean deliveries over 4 years.
A prior cesarean delivery can have an adverse effect on maternal and neonatal postpartum outcomes in subsequent births, according to a retrospective study of 10,600 live births.
A new study of women with a previous cesarean finds that those attempting a vaginal delivery do indeed face a risk of uterine rupture during labor, whereas the chance of that happening in a planned cesarean is practically nil.
The debate over elective cesareans has focused on the benefits some women perceive in the procedure.
The impact of nonclinical factors has implications for policy and quality improvement, but before taking action we need to adjust for clinical differences that should be related to cesareans.