sympathetic trunk

(redirected from Cervical sympathetic chain)

trunk

 [trungk]
1. the part of the body to which the head and limbs are attached; called also torso.
2. a larger structure, such as a vessel or nerve, from which smaller divisions or branches arise, or that is created by their union. adj., adj trun´cal.
brachiocephalic trunk truncus brachiocephalicus.
celiac trunk the arterial trunk arising from the abdominal aorta and giving origin to the left gastric, common hepatic, and splenic arteries.
encephalic trunk brainstem.
lumbosacral trunk a trunk formed by union of the lower part of ventral branch of the fourth lumbar nerve with the ventral branch of the fifth lumbar nerve.
lymphatic t's the lymphatic vessels (right or left lumbar, intestinal, right or left bronchomediastinal, right or left subclavian, and right or left jugular trunks) that drain lymph from various regions of the body into the right lymphatic or thoracic duct.
pulmonary trunk a vessel arising from the conus arteriosus of the right ventricle and bifurcating into the right and left pulmonary arteries.
sympathetic trunk two long ganglionated nerve strands, one on each side of the vertebral column, extending from the base of the skull to the coccyx.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

sym·pa·thet·ic trunk

[TA]
one of the two long ganglionated nerve strands alongside the vertebral column that extend from the base of the skull to the coccyx; they are connected to each spinal nerve by gray rami and receive fibers from the spinal cord through white rami connecting with the thoracic and upper lumbar spinal nerves.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

sym·pa·thet·ic trunk

(sim'pă-thet'ik trŭngk) [TA]
One of the two long, ganglionated nerve strands alongside the vertebral column that extend from the base of the skull to the coccyx; they are connected to each spinal nerve by gray rami and receive fibers from the spinal cord through white rami connecting with the thoracic and upper lumbar spinal nerves.
Synonym(s): truncus sympathicus [TA] .
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The most frequent origin in the neck region is the cervical sympathetic chain, but it can also be located in the larynx, pharynx, and ganglion nodosum of the vagus nerve (9).
Earlier, the location of the cervical sympathetic chain was considered to be superficial to prevertebral fascia, but now it is confirmed by the USG imaging and dissection that the sympathetic chain is located subfascially (8).
The cervical sympathetic chain lies ventral to the transverse process of the cervical vertebrae and dorsal to the carotid vessels.
The lesion may be in the cerebral hemisphere, hypothalamus, cervical spinal cord, T1 spinal root, cervical sympathetic chain and carotid plexus because sympathetic sensation belonging to the eye is long (1-3).
The possible causes of HS after thyroid surgery have been attributed to the postoperative formation of a hematoma compressing the cervical sympathetic chain, ischaemia-induced damage caused by a lateral ligature on the inferior thyroid artery trunk, stretching of the cervical sympathetic chain by the tip of the retractor, and damage to communication between the cervical sympathetic chain and the recurrent laryngeal nerve during its identification [6].
(2) In the head and neck, they usually arise from the cervical sympathetic chain. Other rare sites include the hypoglossal nerve, the vagus nerve, (3) the pharynx, and the larynx.
To the best of our knowledge, this is a very rare report in terms of thyroid benign nodule associated with irreversible HS due to cervical sympathetic chain compression.
Tan, "Imaging characteristics of schwannoma of the cervical sympathetic chain: a review of 12 cases," American Journal of Neuroradiology, vol.
(9) Horner syndrome may result from cervical sympathetic chain invasion, and syncope can occur after carotid sinus compression.
Phrenic, vagus, glossopharyngeal and cervical sympathetic chain nerve involvement have also been reported, although these are associated more with a deep cervical plexus block.
Homer's syndrome due to a large Schwannoma of the cervical sympathetic chain: report of case.