cerebral infarct


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ce·re·bral in·farct

(sĕr-ēbrăl in-fahrkt)
Localized necrosis of brain tissue caused by impaired blood flow.

cerebral infarct

A stroke resulting from interrupted blood flow to one of the large or small arteries of the brain.
See also: infarct
References in periodicals archive ?
The evaluation of the neurological score and cerebral infarct size indicated that DAP treatment effectively protected against cerebral I/R injury induced by MCAO/R.
Cerebral infarct volumes were expressed as the percentage of infarcted tissue relative to total brain tissue.
A multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that older age, longer length of hospital stay, and presence of large cerebral infarct were independent predictors of poor hospital discharge outcome.
(10-12) The causes of cerebral infarct in humans include systemic hypertension, cardioembolism, and atherosclerosis, among others, (13) whereas in dogs hypertension, (14) hypercoagulable states, (14) atherosclerosis, (7,14) septic thromboemboli, (7) embolic metastatic tumor cells, (7) fibrocartilaginous embolism (7) and aberrant parasite migration or parasitic emboli (7) have been reported.
The neurologists believed the clinical picture was consistent with a postpartum vasculopathy leading to an ischaemic cerebral infarct, despite her vasculitic screen being negative for anti-nuclear, double-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid, extractable nuclear and anticardiolipin antibodies, rheumatoid factor and lupus anticoagulant.
It is also beneficial to have a second CT scan clone three to six hours after the initial scan in order to better examine possible signs of a stroke or early stages of a major cerebral infarct.
Over a mean follow-up period of 5 years, silent cerebral infarct was observed in 8.7% of study participants while clinical stroke occurred in 1.7% of study participants.
Each student (with or without a history of cerebral infarct) in the hematology office had an annual educational inventory as part of routine practice.
Earlier diagnosis and appropriate referral could have potentially helped reduce the extent of cerebral infarct burden.
The patient with cerebral infarct (case 2) was also managed with anti-platelets and other supportive care as required.
It has been demonstrated that there were a negative correlation between lesion volumes and NSC-derived MVs in the ischemic stroke patients [17], which suggested that transplantation of NSC-derived MVs could decrease cerebral infarct volume.