contusion

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contusion

 [kon-too´zhun]
injury to tissues with skin discoloration and without breakage of skin; called also bruise. Blood from the broken vessels accumulates in surrounding tissues, producing pain, swelling, and tenderness, and the discoloration is the result of blood seepage just under the skin. Most heal without special treatment, but cold compresses may reduce bleeding if applied immediately after the injury, and thus may reduce swelling, discoloration, and pain.

If a contusion is unusually severe, the injured part should be rested and slightly elevated; later application of heat may hasten absorption of blood. Serious complications may develop in some cases. Normally blood is drawn off from the bruised area in a few days, but occasionally blood clotted in the area may form a cyst or may calcify and require surgical treatment. Contusions may also be complicated by infection.
cerebral contusion contusion of the brain following a head injury. It may occur with extradural or subdural collections of blood, in which case the patient may be left with neurologic defects or epilepsy. (See also cranial hematoma.)
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

con·tu·sion

(kon-tū'zhŭn),
Any mechanical injury (usually caused by a blow) resulting in hemorrhage beneath unbroken skin.
See also: bruise.
[L. contusio, a bruising]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

contusion

(kən-to͞o′zhən, -tyo͞o′-)
n.
An injury in which the skin is not broken; a bruise.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

contusion

Dermatology A bruise, an injury without a break in the skin, in which subcutaneous blood vessels rupture, resulting in ecchymotic patches, often due to a blow from a blunt object. See Brain contusion, Cerebral contusion, Cortical contusion, Hip-pointer contusion.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

con·tu·sion

(kŏn-tū'zhŭn)
Any mechanical injury (usually caused by a blow) resulting in hemorrhage beneath unbroken skin.
See also: bruise, ecchymosis
[L. contusio, a bruising]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

contusion

A bruise.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

con·tu·sion

(kŏn-tū'zhŭn)
Any mechanical injury (usually caused by a blow) resulting in hemorrhage beneath unbroken skin.
[L. contusio, a bruising]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
TBI Caused Cerebral Contusion and Increased Cerebral Levels of TNF-[alpha], Which Etanercept Attenuated.
The current study demonstrates that TBI, in addition to inducing cerebral contusion and neurological motor deficits, induces the overproduction of TNF-[alpha] as well as the increased numbers of the colocalizations of BrdU and DCX specific markers in the contused bran tissues.
Cerebral contusions are circumscribed areas of brain tissue destruction which are accompanied by extravasation of blood into affected tissues.
In 27.1% cases cerebral contusions were associated with fracture of the skull.
Thereafter, as injury severity increases, we can also predict that the additional impairments that begin to accrue will arise from the greater degree of axonal damage and also from the anatomic distribution of both the axonal lesions and the other lesions, particularly the cerebral contusions and abrasions that mark greater injury severity.
Microvascular alterations following cerebral contusion in rats.
Cerebral contusions were seen in 52% and were multiple in 56%.
Cerebral Contusions: Cerebral contusions were seen in 32 cases (52%) and were multiple in 56%.
Conventional neuroimaging such as CT and MRI detect hemorrhage and cerebral contusions, but may be normal in a concussed athlete because a concussion is a functional rather than a structural brain injury.
B.'s computed tomography (CT) scan of the brain revealed bilateral cerebral contusions, more on the left than right.
A CT scan done 20 min after arrival revealed a right SDH, cerebral contusions in the right temporal and parietal region, SAH, and left basilar skull fracture.
All these patients had cerebral contusions, subdural hematomas, or traumatic subarachnoid injury.