cerebral hypoxia

(redirected from Cerebral anoxia)

cerebral hypoxia

↓ O2 in brain; depending on the duration and severity, Sx range from mild–eg, lethargy to serious neurologic damage–eg, coma, seizures, death

cerebral hypoxia

Lack of oxygen supply to the brain, usually as a result of either diminished blood flow (such as in traumatic childbirth or cardiopulmonary arrest) or diminished oxygenation of the blood (such as in high-altitude exposures or patients with advanced cardiopulmonary disease). If nothing is done to treat this condition, irreversible anoxic damage to the brain begins after 4 to 6 min and sooner in some cases. If basic resuscitation measures are begun before the end of this period, the onset of cerebral death may be postponed.
See: cardiopulmonary resuscitation
See also: hypoxia
References in periodicals archive ?
* Has experienced a severe neurological insult (post-resuscitation, cerebral anoxia, CVA, cerebral haemorrhage, encephalopathy, traumatic brain injury, Glasgow score less than 5)
Individual of any age; has experienced a severe neurological insult (post-resuscitation, cerebral anoxia, CVA, cerebral haemorrhage, encephalopathy, traumatic brain injury and a Glasgow score of
SP showed a decreasing trend due to cerebral anoxia and cerebral edema caused by cerebral hemorrhage, meanwhile, with the decline of SP, other neurotransmitter metabolic disorder will also appear, thus the decrease of SP can aggravate the situation of edema and increase intracranial pressure.12 In this study, the SF levels of patients in the research group were significantly lower than that in the control group of patients with craniotomy.
The coroner accepted his medical cause of death as cerebral anoxia due to hanging, and noted there was sufficient MDMA and anti-depressant in his system to potentially affect his behaviour.
[10] It was hypothesised that the low haemoglobin causes rapid cerebral anoxia due to decreased oxygen carrying capacity of blood that in turn leads to the Breath holding spells.
Troupin, "Action myoclonus following acute cerebral anoxia," Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, vol.
Various physiological events were thought to lead to encephalopathy such as cerebral oedema, cerebral haemorrhage, hyponatraemia, fulminant hepatic failure6, cerebral anoxia, micro-capillary haemorrhage and release of toxic products7.
A post-mortem examination revealed Miss Cannings died as a result of cerebral anoxia as a result of hanging.
(6) Although the exact incidence of DPHL is unknown, the precipitating event typically involves cerebral anoxia, which can occur through carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning, strangulation, cardiac arrest, respiratory failure, and overdose from sedatives and narcotics (Table 2) (7) DPHL was first observed in a small percentage (2.75%) of patients suffering from CO poisoning.
The third patient did not have any overt cerebral anoxia but had received a blood transfusion preceding this event.
Impairment of cerebral circulation leads to cerebral anoxia and loss of neuronal function.
Scans revealed that the incident caused cerebral anoxia as the oxygen supply to his brain had been cut off.