Cercariae


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cercaria

 [ser-kar´e-ah] (pl. cerca´riae) (L.)
the final, free-swimming larval stage of a trematode parasite.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

cercaria

(ser-ka're-a) plural.cercariae [Gr. kerkos, tail]
A free-swimming stage in the development of a fluke or trematode. Cercariae develop within sporocysts or rediae that parasitize snails or bivalve mollusks. They emerge from the mollusk and either enter their final host directly or encyst in an intermediate host that is ingested by the final host. In the latter case, the encysted tailless form is known as a metacercaria.
See: fluke; trematode
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners

Cercariae

The free-living form of the schistosome worm that has a tail, swims, and has suckers on its head for penetration into a host.
Mentioned in: Schistosomiasis
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
To complete their stage of the transmission process, cercariae must find and infect the second intermediate host, often a bivalve, crustacean or small fish.
In this context, the goal of the present work was to complete the description of the cercariae found in the sampling of molluscs of this environment.
Snails which became infected in spring would begin shedding cercariae ~50 days post-infection when wetlands provide green vegetation during early fall senescence.
The destruction of the digestive gland was even more severe may be due to the developing of daughter sporocycts which contains many of the developing cercariae.
In the absence of cercariae exit, the compression method with the subsequent microscopy was applied [2,3].
(4) Humans get infected with this disease when they make contact with water contaminated with the skin-penetrating cercariae. Prevalence of schistosomiasis, at present, is still high in sub-Saharan Africa.
Another common cause of seasonal clusters of pruritic rashes may be caused by aquatic exposures to the infective stage cercariae of several avian schistosomes, or flatworms, that are released into freshwater lakes and rivers in the tens of thousands by infected aquatic snail intermediate hosts in a complicated life cycle (Figure 2).