ceramide

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ceramide

 [ser´ah-mīd]
the basic unit of the sphingolipids, consisting of sphingosine or a related base attached via its amino group to a long-chain fatty acid anion. Ceramides accumulate abnormally in farber's disease.
ceramide glucoside the major sphingolipid accumulated in Gaucher's disease.
ceramide lactosidosis a sphingolipidosis in which ceramide lactoside accumulates in neural and visceral tissues owing to a deficiency of a β-galactosidase.
ceramide trihexoside the major sphingolipid accumulated in Fabry's disease.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

cer·a·mide

(ser'ă-mīd),
Generic term for a class of sphingolipid, N-acyl (fatty acid) derivatives of a long chain base or sphingoid such as sphinganine or sphingosine; for example, CH3(CH2)12CH=CH-CHOH-CH(CH2OH)-NH-CO-R, where R is the fatty-acyl residue, attached in this example to 4-sphingenine (sphingosine) in amide linkage. Ceramides accumulate in people with Farber disease.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

ceramide

(sîr′ə-mĭd′, sĕr′-)
n.
Any of a group of lipids that are formed by the linking of a fatty acid to sphingosine, are found in cell membranes, and help to regulate the differentiation, proliferation, and death of cells.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

cer·a·mide

(ser'ă-mīd)
Generic term for a class of sphingolipid, N-acyl (fatty acid) derivatives of a long chain base or sphingoid such as sphingenine or sphingosine. Ceramides accumulate in people with disseminated lipogranulomatosis.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
M2 PRESSWIRE-August 12, 2019-: Ceramide Market Is Anticipated To Witness Commendable Growth Owing To Rising Need For Anti-Aging And Environmental Protection Cosmetics Products Till 2022 | Million Insights
These insights are curated from the intelligence report, titled, 'Global Market Study on Ceramides Market: Rising Significance of Natural Personal Care Ingredients to Drive Demand,' which has been of late added to Market Research Reports Search Engine's (MRRSE) overarching armamentarium.
CeraVe offers a wide variety of therapeutic skin care products that are developed with dermatologists and contain an exclusive combination of ceramides 1, 3 and 6-n, which are essential to restoring and maintaining the skin's natural barrier.
The researchers went on to find that ceramides can enter inside immune cells called monocytes and change the way these cells read the genetic information encoded in the DNA.
Seeking a way to revitalize aging skin, scientists have found skin rejuvenating benefits in ceramides from plant extracts.
Ceramides are found in small amounts in plant and animal tissues.
Igarashi, "Mammalian Lass6 and its related family members regulate synthesis of specific ceramides," Biochemical Journal, vol.
Elizabeth Arden Advanced Ceramide Eye Serum Capsules, PS52 for 60 Replenishes the skin's own ceramides (important for plumped skin) which dwindle over time.
The fire ant-derived treatment imitates molecules that naturally occur in skin called ceramides, which are crucial for skin function because they support its barrier function, according to the researchers' study in the journal (https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-017-10580-y) Scientific Reports .
The serum's building block technology features the protein-strengthening ingredient Matrixyl 3000 Plus complex found in NoTs existing serum ranges, along with an additional complex of calcium amino acids and ceramides to help boost epidermal strength.
Ceramides as bioactive sphingolipids are described as molecules with a capability to modulate the balance between the proliferation of the cell and the programmed cell death (Radin, 2001; Senchenkov et al., 2001).