cephalopod

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cephalopod

(sĕf′ə-lə-pŏd′)
n.
Any of various carnivorous marine mollusks of the class Cephalopoda, having a large head, a mouth with a chitinous beak surrounded by arms or tentacles, and in most species, an ink sac containing a dark fluid used for defense, and including the octopuses, squids, cuttlefishes, and nautiluses.

ceph·a·lo·pod′ adj.

cephalopod

any member of the class Cephalopoda containing molluscs such as squids (10 arms) and octopuses (8 arms). They have a well-developed brain, eyes very similar to vertebrate eyes (an example of CONVERGENCE), and are capable of rapidly changing colour through the possession of CHROMATOPHORES.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cephalopods from continental shelf and slope around Japan: the intensive research of unexploited fishery resources on continental slopes.
Cephalopods behave in ways that certainly suggest they're highly intelligent.
The systematics and identification of larval cephalopods from the northern North Pacific.
The Cephalopod group of organisms (squids, cuttlefish, Octopuses) belongs to phylum Mollusca and has cosmopolitan distribution (Norman, 2000).
Cephalopods were identified by examination of beaks (Wolff, 1982, 1984; Clarke, 1986; Xavier and Cherel, 2009).
In this study, we first used a computer screen to present different visual stimuli to cuttlefish, representing a potentially new experimental device for the behavioral study of cephalopods, allowing results to be compared between phylogenetically different animal groups.
Clarke, "The role of cephalopods in the world's oceans: General conclusions and the future," Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, vol.
All year, I have been seeing reports of greater and greater numbers of all cephalopods in UK waters, especially octopuses.
"We were drawn by how successful cephalopods are at changing their skin texture, so we studied and drew inspiration from the muscles that allow cephalopods to control their texture, and implemented these ideas into a method for controlling the shape of soft, stretchable materials."
This process, called RNA editing, is an extremely rare exception in most animal groups, but among coeloid cephalopods, this seems to be widespread.
This exciting and extremely rare intertidal encounter has prompted a formal report on the sighting and also an overview of the biology of this species and of cephalopods more generally.