centrosome

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Related to Centrosomes: endoplasmic reticulum, Peroxisomes, Plastids

centrosome

 [sen´tro-sōm]
a specialized area of condensed cytoplasm containing the centrioles and playing an important part in mitosis.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

cy·to·cen·trum

(sī'tō-sen'trŭm),
A zone of cytoplasm containing one or two centrioles but devoid of other organelles; usually located near the nucleus of a cell.
[cyto- + G. kentron, center]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

centrosome

(sĕn′trə-sōm′)
n.
A small region of cytoplasm adjacent to the nucleus that contains the centrioles and serves to organize microtubules.

cen′tro·so′mic (-sō′mĭk) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

centrosome

(1) Uncertain; possibly the microtubule organising centre (MTOC). 
(2) The smallest hypothetical unit of life, the cytocentrum.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

cy·to·cen·trum

(sī'tō-sen'trŭm)
A zone of cytoplasm containing one or two centrioles but devoid of other organelles; usually located near the nucleus of a cell.
Synonym(s): centrosome, microcentrum.
[cyto- + G. kentron, center]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

centrosome

A small mass of CYTOPLASM, lying near the nucleus of a cell and consisting of a pair of centrioles, which divides into two parts before cell division. These migrate to the poles of the cell and the spindle develops between them.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

centrosome

an area of cell CYTOPLASM found near the nucleus, whose function is thought to be the organization of nuclear division since it is capable of assembling and disassembling MICROTUBULES. When nuclear division starts, the centrosome divides into two organizing centres which migrate to each pole (along with the CENTRIOLES, if present) and the spindle develops between them.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Autoantibodies to a group of centrosomal proteins in human autoimmune sera reactive with the centrosome. Arthritis Rheum 1998;41:551-558.
Within the bulges, chromosomes, centrosomes, and microtubules were observed.
Kannan et al., "Identification of novel small molecule inhibitors of centrosome clustering in cancer cells," Oncotarget, vol.
Similar to the AAK-depleted conditions, cells treated with a 125 nmol [1.sup.-1] concentration of the inhibitor, MLN8237--which specifically inhibits AAK in Drosophila S2 cells (Ye et al., 2015), resulting in a loss of phosphorylated AAK (pAAK) from centrosomes (Fig.
Centrosome aberrations: cause or consequence of cancer progression?
Instability of centrosomes and microtubules plays a major role in oocyte aging as these ultrastructures are responsible for proper separation of chromosomes at meiotic poles.
However, this study found that microtubules could additionally develop from the chromosomes themselves, or at arbitrary sites throughout the main body of the cell, if the centrosomes were missing.
de Mey, "Taxol induces the assembly of free microtubules in living cells and blocks the organizing capcity of the centrosomes and kinetochores," Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol.
Otto, "Cilia and centrosomes: a unifying pathogenic concept for cystic kidney disease?" Nature Reviews Genetics, vol.
NIMA kinase 6 (Nek6) act probably with Cdk1 and contributes to separation of centrosomes [35, 36].