centromere

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centromere

 [sen´tro-mēr]
the clear constricted portion of the chromosome at which the chromatids are joined and by which the chromosome is attached to the spindle during cell division. adj., adj centromer´ic.
 Position of the centromere in A, metacentric, B, submetacentric, C, acrocentric, and D, telocentric chromosomes. From Dorland's, 2000.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

cen·tro·mere

(sen'trō-mēr),
1. The nonstaining primary constriction of a chromosome that is the point of attachment of the spindle fiber; provides the mechanism of chromosome movement during cell division; the centromere divides the chromosome into two arms, and its position is constant for a specific chromosome: near one end (acrocentric), near the center (metacentric), or between (submetacentric).
[centro- + G. meros, part]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

centromere

(sĕn′trə-mîr′)
n.
The most condensed and constricted region of a chromosome, to which the spindle fiber is attached during mitosis.

cen′tro·mer′ic (-mĕr′ĭk, -mîr′-) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

centromere

(1) An obsolete term for the neck of the sprematozoon. 
(2) Centromere; centromerus [NH3].
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

cen·tro·mere

(sen'trō-mēr)
The nonstaining primary constriction of a chromosome; the centromere divides the chromosome into two arms and its position is constant for a specific chromosome: near one end (acrocentric), near the center (metacentric), or between (submetacentric).
[centro- + G. meros, part]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

centromere

The constriction in a chromosome at which the two identical halves (chromatids) of the newly longitudinally-divided chromosome are joined, and at which the chromosome attaches to the spindle fibre during division (mitosis). The centromere contains no genes.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

centromere

a structure occurring at one point along the length of a CHROMOSOME, often visible under the light microscope as a bump or a constriction whose location can help to identify the chromosome. The centromere contains a complex system of fibres called the kinetochore which becomes duplicated when the chromosomes divide into CHROMATIDS. The kinetochore attaches to SPINDLE microtubules during nuclear division. Damaged chromosomes without centromeres (ACENTRIC CHROMOSOMES) fail to move normally during nuclear division.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Centromere

The centromere is the constricted region of a chromosome. It performs certain functions during cell division.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Secondly, researchers can use centromeres to look at ancestry and evolutionary descent.
Sequential de novo centromere formation and inactivation on a chromosomal fragment in maize.
Perhaps, the density of structures in and around the centromere prevents anti-CENP-A antibody accessibility, or the blastomere with detectable fluorescence was inclined to apoptosis and displayed relatively loose structures that enabled anti-CENP-A antibody accessibility.
Repetitive satellite DNA sequences (alphoid DNA) are essential for centromere formation and function during cell division [1, 2].
The Tau sequence was inserted downstream of the centromere protein C (CENP-C) promoter to drive expression of the reporter.
The findings that C-bands localize in the centromere and telomere regions of the chromosomes in A.
In these rarely appearing mitotic cells, survivin was only partially delocalized from centromere in comparison with its large delocalization observed for DAC + SAHA (Figures 5(a) and 5(b)).
New York University researchers focused on the organization and functioning of the centromere, which is responsible for chromosome segregation--a process that ensures that replicating cells receive a complete copy of the genome.
Amon, "Emerging roles for centromeres in meiosis I chromosome segregation," Nature Reviews Genetics, vol.