centriole

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centriole

 [sen´tre-ōl]
either of the two cylindrical organelles located in the centrosome and containing nine triplets of microtubules arrayed around their edges; centrioles migrate to opposite poles of the cell during cell division and serve to organize the spindles. They are capable of independent replication and of migrating to form basal bodies.
ring centriole a common misnomer for the anulus of the spermatozoon, which is not actually a centriole.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

cen·tri·ole

(sen'trē-ōl),
Tubular structures, 150 nm by 300-500 nm, with a wall having nine triple microtubules, usually seen as paired organelles lying in the cytocentrum; centrioles may be multiple and numerous in some cells, such as the giant cells of bone marrow.
[G. kentron, a point, center]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

centriole

(sĕn′trē-ōl′)
n.
One of two cylindrical cellular structures that are composed of nine triplet microtubules and form the asters during mitosis.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

cen·tri·ole

(sen'trē-ōl)
Tubular structures usually seen as paired organelles lying in the cytocentrum; centrioles may be multiple and numerous in some cells, such as the giant cells of bone marrow.
[G. kentron, a point, center]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

centriole

A short, hollow, cylindrical ORGANELLE consisting of nine sets of microtubules and usually occurring in pairs set at right angles to each other. Centrioles are responsible for the production of the spindle apparatus that appears just before the separation of the chromosomes into two sets prior to cell division.

centriole

One of the two rod-like bodies in cells forming the poles of the spindles during cell division.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
Centrioleclick for a larger image
Fig. 97 Centriole . Structure and orientation.

centriole

one of a pair of small ORGANELLES lying at right angles to each other in an area known as the CENTROSOME, just outside the nucleus of lower plants and all animals (see Fig. 97 ). Centrioles are self-replicating, dividing into two during the ‘S’ phase of the INTERPHASE of the CELL CYCLE and then separating into two pairs, one pair migrating to each pole of the future mitotic spindle, from which an ASTER forms. The role of centrioles in nuclear division is unclear, since they are absent from most plant cells and laser-beam irradiation of centrioles has no effect on division.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
For example, both centrosomes may have mature distal and subdistal appendages of the centrioles and can attach to the oocyte membrane.
Although superficially similar to the centrosomes of algal and animal cells, POs are not permanent cell organelles and they do not contain centrioles. Rather, they are transient concentrations of [gamma]-Tubulin that appear de novo at opposite poles of nuclei preparing to divide and disappear by metaphase (Brown et al., 2004).
The midpiece region has orthogonally arranged proximal and distal centrioles. The proximal is about 2 pm long and is connected to the nucleus by electron-dense granular material (Fig.
Scale bar: 500 nm; 11, microgamont (MIC) with peripherally arranged nuclei (N), without nucleoli, note the presence of mitochondrion (MI) and centriole (C) in the vicinity of the nuclei.
Centrin-2 is required for centriole duplication in mammalian cells.
The zygote centrosome has duplicated centrioles and maternal gamma tubulin is further added to the PCM in the ooplasm to make it a functional centrosome, when the centrosome forms the sperm monoaster.
Throughout early prophase, the centrioles migrate laterally and eventually occupy opposite sides of the cell.
The differences in the shape of spermatozoa, the number of mitochondria, the arrangement of centrioles, as well as the occurrence of lateral flagellar ribbons among teleost species may have consequences in the swimming behavior with respect to sperm velocity, swimming types, and the head detachment (Lahnsteiner and Patzner, 1995).
Some signaling and feedback systems must operate on a diversity of scales, including: micron or submicron scales (e.g., coordinated transport of chromosomes to the centrioles during mitosis); between adjacent cells (e.g., via gap junction communication, across synaptic gaps between neurons, or between neurons and muscle cells); over larger distances via concentration gradients of signaling molecules that are essential for segmentation of the embryo, establishment of the anterior/posterior ground plan, distinction between dorsal versus ventral sides of the embryo, and migration of future neurons to appropriate locations for differentiation and synaptogenesis; and, finally, over centimeters and even meters via specific nervous signals and endocrine hormones circulating in the blood.
Previous research suggested that NC associate closely with centrioles and only exist during early interphase, which is identified by the presence of a midbody during cytokinesis between daughter cells.
Within the cytoplasm of the cell exists the nucleus, organelles, golgi bodies, lysosomes, endoplasmic reticulum, and centrioles (Tortora, 1976) (Figure II, IIIB, and IV).
We have proposed physicochemical mechanisms based upon electrostatics which explain and unify the basic motions during mitosis and cytokinesis: (1) centrioles to poles, (2) chromosomes to metaphase "plate", (3) alignment of chromosomes, (4) anaphase A motion of chromosomes, (5) rounding up of cells, (6) cell elongation, and (7) furrowing.