centre

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centre

See center.

cen·ter

(sen'tĕr) [TA]
1. The middle point of a body.
2. A center of any kind, especially an anatomic center.
Synonym(s): centrum [TA] , centre.
3. A group of nerve cells governing a specific function.
4. A health care or therapeutic facility performing a particular function or service for people in the surrounding area.
Synonym(s): centre.
[L. centrum; G. kentron]

centre

group of nerve cells governing a specific function
  • Brocha's centre small area within left cerebral hemisphere; an essential component of speech mechanisms; if affected by cerebrovascular accident (CVA) (i.e. CVA affecting the right side of the body), aphasia results

  • ossification centre bone area/areas where calcification of the osteoid matrix begins; primary ossification centre is usually within the shaft of a long bone; a secondary ossification centre occurs in an epiphysis or a tuberosity

  • Wernicke's centre a large area of the left cerebral hemisphere essential to the understanding and formulation of coherent speech; when affected by cerebrovascular accident (manifesting on the right side of the body) communication and speech difficulties result

cen·ter

(sen'tĕr) [TA]
1. The middle point of a body; loosely, the interior of a body, especially an anatomic center.
2. A group of nerve cells governing a specific function.
[L. centrum; G. kentron]
References in classic literature ?
steeple” was a little cupola, reared on the very centre of the roof, on four tall pillars of pine that were fluted with a gouge, and loaded with mouldings.
In the centre stood George and Sophie, a little aghast, their interests reaching out on every side.
Then its self-approval became too much for it; it burst into a bright red smile in the centre.
Washington and myself while holding a series of meetings among the coloured people in the large centres of Negro population, especially in the large cities of the ex-slaveholding states.
He seemed to come from the humming oily centre of the machine where the polished rods are sliding, and the pistons thumping; he grasped things so firmly but so loosely; he made the others appear like old maids cheapening remnants.
She blushed and looked at him as the garden flowers look at us when we walk forth happily among them in the transcendent evening light: is there not a soul beyond utterance, half nymph, half child, in those delicate petals which glow and breathe about the centres of deep color?
Ward's women, as we have said, are more organic, sympathetic, and really creative, than her men, and make their vitality evident by becoming, quite naturally, the centres of very [62] life-like and dramatic groups of people, family or social; while her men are the very genii of isolation and division.
Despairing messages were flashing from every quarter to the great centres of learning, to the chemists and the doctors of world-wide repute, imploring their advice.
From the old and sprouting nuts she took the solid, spongy centres and turned them into salads.
In the intervals of pandemonium, each chattered, cut up, hooted, screeched, and danced, himself sufficient unto himself, filled with his own ideas and volitions to the exclusion of all others, a veritable centre of the universe, divorced for the time being from any unanimity with the other universe-centres leaping and yelling around him.
The Hesiodic poems fall into two groups according as they are didactic (technical or gnomic) or genealogical: the first group centres round the "Works and Days", the second round the "Theogony".
If a number of equal spheres be described with their centres placed in two parallel layers; with the centre of each sphere at the distance of radius x sqrt(2) or radius x 1.

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