Central venous access catheter

Central venous access catheter

A tube placed just beneath the skin to allow doctors and nurses constant and pain-free access to the veins, often when a patient is in the hospital or has a chronic disease such as cancer. The doctors and nurses can draw blood and give medications and nutrients through the catheter.
Mentioned in: Blood Clots
References in periodicals archive ?
The first indwelling central venous access catheter was introduced by Hickman et al.
Guidelines from the National Kidney Foundation (KDOQI) suggest that all AVF options should be exhausted before resorting to central venous access catheters [1].
The nine contributions in this collection recommend administrative and clinical measures for preventing transmission of infectious agents in healthcare settings, discussing central venous access catheters, pediatric cancer patients, severe acute exacerbations of COPD, and mycobacteria infection during HIV.
Since distribution of urokinase was ordered halted in 1999 due to persistent contamination concerns, there has been no Food and Drug Administration-approved thrombolytic agent for treatment of thrombosed central venous access catheters, explained Dr.
Central venous access Catheters, technology, and physiology.

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