Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

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Related to Centers for Disease Control: National Center for Health Statistics

Cen·ters for Dis·ease Con·trol and Pre·ven·tion (CDC),

(sen'tĕrz dis-ēz kon-trōl prē-ven'shŭn),
The U.S. federal facility for disease eradication, epidemiology, and education with headquarters in Atlanta, Georgia, which encompasses the Center for Infectious Diseases, Center for Environmental Health, Center for Health Promotion and Education, Center for Prevention Services, Center for Professional Development and Training, and Center for Occupational Safety and Health. Formerly named Center for Disease Control (1970), Communicable Disease Center (1946).
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
The premier epidemiologic agency in the world which operates under the US Department of Health and Human Services and is located in Atlanta, Georgia; its mission is to promote health and quality of life by preventing and controlling disease, injury and disability; it is nonregulatory and has 11 centers, offices and institutes
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

Cen·ters for Dis·ease· Con·trol· and Pre·ven·tion

(CDC) (sen'tĕrz di-zēz' kŏn-trōl' prĕven'shŭn)
The U.S. federal facility for disease eradication, epidemiology, and education headquartered in Atlanta, Georgia, which encompasses the Center for Infectious Diseases, Center for Environmental Health, Center for Health Promotion and Education, Center for Prevention Services, Center for Professional Development and Training, and Center for Occupational Safety and Health. It maintains several coding sets included in HIPAA standards (e.g., ICD-9-CM codes). Formerly named the Center for Disease Control (1970) and the Communicable Disease Center (1946).
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Cen·ters for Dis·ease Con·trol and Pre·ven·tion

(CDC) (sen'tĕrz di-zēz' kŏn-trōl' prĕ-ven'shŭn)
The U.S. federal facility for disease eradication, epidemiology, and education with headquarters in Atlanta, Georgia.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Centers for Disease Control said the Zoonotic diseases are important health concerns, and control requires collaboration between Pakistan's veterinary and human health sectors.
Address for correspondence: Nina Marano, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Rd NE, Mailstop EO3, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA; email: NMarano@cdc.gov
Influenza (Flu)/Primary Changes and Updates in the 2005 Recommendations, Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, August 8, 2005.
But one organization, the New York City-based public policy advocacy group, Housing Works, used the Centers for Disease Control data and local New York state statistics to show how a funding disparity toward HIV/AIDS groups was just as much to blame for the high incidence rates in communities of color.
The Centers for Disease Control states: "N-9 can damage the cells lining the rectum, thus providing a portal of entry for HIV and other sexually transmissible agents.
Jeanette Stehr-Green, Public Health Practice Program Office, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Nancy Gathany, Public Health Practice Program Office, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Lisa Barrios Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
The intervention, the social influences approach, was well developed, utilizing critical components for school-based tobacco prevention recommended by both the National Cancer Institute and the Centers for Disease Control, with the number of hours of intervention exceeding the recommended levels of exposure.
Moreover, of the 612,078 AIDS cases reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) through June 1997 in the United States, 379,258 have died (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1997, p.
The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) now recommends that high-risk groups, including nursing home residents, who have already been immunized should receive a second shot five years after the first.
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