cellulose

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Related to Cellulose fibre: cellulose fiber

cellulose

 [sel´u-lōs]
a carbohydrate forming the skeleton of most plant structures and plant cells. It is the most abundant polysaccharide in nature and is the source of dietary fiber, preventing constipation by adding bulk to the stool. Good sources in the diet are vegetables, cereals, and fruits.
absorbable cellulose (oxidized cellulose) an absorbable oxidation product of cellulose, applied locally to stop bleeding.
cellulose sodium phosphate an insoluble, nonabsorbable cation exchange resin prepared from cellulose; it binds calcium and is used to prevent formation of calcium-containing kidney stones.

cel·lu·lose

(sel'yū-lōs),
A linear B1→4 glucan, composed of cellobiose residues, differing in this respect from starch, which is composed of maltose residues; it forms the basis of vegetable and wood fiber and is the most abundant organic compound; useful in providing bulk in the diet.
Synonym(s): cellulin
[L. cellula, cell, + -ose]

cellulose

(sĕl′yə-lōs′, -lōz′)
n.
A polysaccharide, (C6H10O5)n, that is composed of glucose monomers and is the main constituent of the cell walls of plants. It is used in the manufacture of numerous products, including paper, textiles, pharmaceuticals, and insulation.

cel′lu·lo′sic (-lō′sĭk, -zĭk) adj.

cel·lu·lose

(sel'yū-lōs)
An indigestible carbohydrate found in plants.
[L. cellula, cell, + -ose]

cellulose

A complex polysaccharide forming the structural elements in plants and forming ‘roughage’ in many vegetable foodstuffs. Cellulose cannot be digested to simpler sugars and remains in the intestine.

cellulose

a type of unbranched polysaccharide carbohydrate composed of from one to four linked (3-GLUCOSE units which can be hydrolysed by the enzyme CELLULASE. Cellulose is the main constituent of plant cell walls and is the most common organic compound on earth. It has high tensile strength because of H-bonding and is fully permeable.

cel·lu·lose

(sel'yū-lōs)
A linear B1→4 glucan; forms the basis of vegetable and wood fiber and is the most abundant organic compound.
[L. cellula, cell, + -ose]
References in periodicals archive ?
Due to their hydrophilic nature, cellulose fibres tend to absorb water vapour from the environment, especially, under high-humidity conditions, as well as grease and oil.
An important parameter is also the pH value, which in alkaline media influences the swelling of cellulose fibres and accelerates the glue and ink removal.
* Resist the temptation to mix cellulose fibre into any of the left over milk coat plaster.
The initial moisture content of cellulose fibres is between 5 and 10%.
17 June 2010 - Finnish investment group Neomarkka Oyj (HEL: NEMBV) said today that it negotiates with firm Kuitu Finland Ltd regarding possible investment in the latter's specialty cellulose fibre factory to be re-established.
Lenzing, which will remain a minority shareholder in Lenzing Plastics with a stake of 15%, decided to withdraw from the plastics business in order to focus on man-made cellulose fibres.
The potential sale of the unit is related to the group's intention to focus on its core business -- man-made cellulose fibres.
Kollmann is responsible for the Austrian operations of US bank Merrill Lynch and Winkler is the CFO of Austrian cellulose fibre specialist Lenzing AG (WBAG:LNZ).
Fluff pulp is bleached softwood cellulose fibre, used in absorbent applications such as baby diapers, feminine hygiene and adult incontinence products.
(ADPnews) - Mar 29, 2010 - Austrian cellulose fibre producer Lenzing AG (WBAG:LNZ) announced today it will invest EUR 78 million (USD 105m) in capacity expansion at its sites in China and Austria.

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