hydrolysis

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hydrolysis

 [hi-drol´ĭsis] (pl. hydrol´yses)
the cleavage of a compound by the addition of water, the hydroxyl group being incorporated in one fragment and the hydrogen atom in the other. adj., adj hydrolyt´ic.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

hy·drol·y·sis

(hī-drol'i-sis),
A chemical process whereby a compound is cleaved into two or more simpler compounds with the uptake of the H and OH parts of a water molecule on either side of the chemical bond cleaved; hydrolysis is effected by the action of acids, alkalies, or enzymes. Compare: hydration.
Synonym(s): hydrolytic cleavage
[hydro- + G. lysis, dissolution]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

hy·drol·y·sis

(hī-drol'i-sis)
A chemical process whereby a compound is cleaved into two or more simpler compounds with the uptake of the H and OH parts of a water molecule on either side of the chemical bond cleaved; hydrolysis is effected by the action of acids, alkalies, or enzymes.
Compare: hydration
[hydro- + G. lysis, dissolution]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

hydrolysis

Splitting of a compound into two parts by the addition of water (H2O), the hydrogen atom (H) joining to one part and the hydroxyl group (OH) joining to the other. Hydrolysis is usually effected by a hydrolytic ENZYME.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

hydrolysis

a chemical reaction in which large molecules are broken down by the addition of water. For example, fat to fatty acids and glycerol, MALTOSE to glucose, DIPEPTIDE to two amino acids. The reactions are usually enzymically activated. Compare CONDENSATION REACTION.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

hy·drol·y·sis

(hī-drol'i-sis)
1. Process by which water slowly penetrates suture filaments and breaks down the suture's polymer chain; hydroxylation produces less tissue reaction.
2. Chemical process in which compound is cloven into two or more simpler compounds; effected by action of acids, alkalis, or enzymes.
[hydro- + G. lysis, dissolution]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Effects of type and level of supplementation and the influence of the rumen pH on cellulolysis in vivo and dry matter digestion of various roughages.
Manipulation of rumen fluid pH and its influence on cellulolysis in sacco, DM degradability and rumen microflora of sheep offered hay or concentrate.
Manipulation of rumen fluid pH and its influence on cellulolysis, in sacco dry matter degradation and the rumen microflora of sheep offered hay or concentrates.
This change creates better conditions for the growth of strict anaerobic cellulolytic bacteria, stimulates their attachment to forage particles (Roger et al., 1990), and increases the initial rate of cellulolysis. In addition, S.
Chenost and Kayouli (1997) emphasized that it is primarily necessary to supply the rumen microorganisms with the nutritive elements needed for self-multiplication as well as for degradation of the cell walls of straw, leading to suitable conditions for maintenance of good cellulolysis. Different supplements can be used, such as concentrates, molasses, multi-nutrient blocks, green leaves, crop residues and locally available by-products.
Effect of type and level of supplementation and the influence on the rumen fluid pH on cellulolysis in vivo and dry matter digestion on various roughages.
These types of studies have provided interesting insights on the digestion process in the rumen, particularly cellulolysis and physical degradation of forage.