biological process

(redirected from Cellular process)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

biological process

A sequence of biological tasks accomplished via one or more ordered assemblies of molecular functions, which generally involve transformation—i.e., A and B enter and C and D come out.

Examples
Cell growth and maintenance, signal transduction, pyrimidine metabolism, cAMP biosynthesis.
References in periodicals archive ?
This review discusses the concept of robust flexibility (a tough cell) and the lack of attention that evolutionary biologists have paid to cellular processes (a tough sell).
During infection bacteria deliver hundreds of proteins into healthy cells that alter cellular processes to turn the hostile environment into one hospitable to bacterial replication, but the specific roles of only about 20 proteins are known, Luo said.
Recent research has suggested that cells and some pathogens use microRNAs to control a variety of cellular processes.
Casma uses several approaches to intervene at strategic points throughout the autophagy system to improve the cellular process of clearing out unwanted proteins, organelles and invading pathogens.
Casma Therapeutics is harnessing the natural cellular process of autophagy to open new target areas for drug discovery and development.
In these cases, the researchers let the cells engulf quantum dots through a natural cellular process called endocytosis.
Both firms will advance new therapies that function through the ubiquitin proteasome system for modulating protein homeostasis, a fundamental cellular process controlling protein levels.
Washington, Dec 21 (ANI): Scientists have discovered that bacteria are able to build camouflaged homes for themselves inside healthy cells, and cause disease, by manipulating a natural cellular process.
A special section is included in this year's edition on [Beta]-arrestins with topics that include the role of [Beta]-arrestin-mediated signaling in chemotaxis cellular process, their role in regulating signaling by receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), and the role of G protein- coupled receptor kinases and arrestins.
Describing how the most common gene mutation found in acute myeloid leukaemia starts the process of cancer development, they suggested that three critical steps are required to transform normal blood cells into leukaemic ones, each subverting a different cellular process.
For example, the fact that RNAi is a natural cellular process may mean that drugs based upon the phenomenon can be expected to be quite efficacious.

Full browser ?