staining

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staining

 [stān´ing]
artificial coloration of a substance to facilitate examination of tissues, microorganisms, or other cells under the microscope. For various techniques, see under stain.
relief staining a method of staining that colors the background and leaves the cells uncolored.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

stain·ing

(stān'ing),
1. The act of applying a stain.
See also: stain.
2. In dentistry, modification of the color of the tooth or denture base.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

stain·ing

(stān'ing)
1. The act of applying a stain.
See also: stain
2. dentistry Modification of the color of the tooth or denture base.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

staining

The use of selected dyes to colour biological specimens such as cells, cell products, thin slices of tissues or microorganisms to assist in examination and identification under the microscope. See also GRAM NEGATIVE, GRAM POSITIVE.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

stain·ing

(stān'ing)
1. In dentistry, modification of the color of the tooth or denture base.
2. Act of applying a stain.
See also: stain
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Rizvanov, "Cell staining by novel derivatives of fluorescent rhodamine dyes," World Applied Sciences Journal, vol.
Furthermore, the TB exclusion assay by flow cytometry means that simultaneous cell staining with monoclonal antibodies conjugated with fluorochromes detectable on the FL2 (585/42 nm) or FL1 (530/30 nm) channel is possible.
Thereafter, CK903 was studied extensively in normal and neoplastic prostatic tissues, validating its diagnostic utility as a differentiating immunomarker between benign and malignant process, with the lack of basal cell staining being an indicator of malignancy.
In a direct comparison of basal cell staining in prostate tissues, MMp40 provided equal staining to p63; however, in certain cases, MMp40 stains were slightly cleaner and more intense than p63 (Figure 5, A and B).
Cytokeratin was positive in surface cells in all 5 cases in which this was available (100%) (Figure 1, C); 3 cases had no round cell staining for cytokeratin and 2 showed weak patchy staining (40%).
Surface cell staining was limited to the periphery of the tumor in 1 case.
Instead, those "negative" glands need to be interpreted within the context of the entire "atypical" focus by comparing the morphology of those negative glands with the surrounding glands that show basal cell staining. It is recommended that glands that are negative for staining in this context be considered benign, as long as they share the same benign cytomorphologic features of the associated surrounding glands in the same focus.
The MIB-1 cell staining rate was low (1%-2% of tumor cells).
The z test comparison of proportions was used to determine if the reticulum cell staining by pan-CK and AE1/AE3 antibodies was statistically different.