lysis

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lysis

 [li´sis]
1. destruction, as of cells by a specific lysin.
2. decomposition, as of a chemical compound by a specific agent. See also degradation.
3. mobilization of an organ by division of restraining adhesions.
4. the gradual abatement of the symptoms of a disease.

ly·sis

(lī'sis),
1. Destruction of red blood cells, bacteria, and other structures by a specific lysin, usually referred to by the structure destroyed (for example, hemolysis, bacteriolysis, nephrolysis); may be due to a direct toxin or an immune mechanism, such as antibody reacting with antigen on the surface of a target cell, usually by binding and activation of a series of proteins in the blood with enzymatic activity (complement system).
2. Gradual subsidence of the symptoms of an acute disease, a form of the recovery process, as distinguished from crisis.
[G. dissolution or loosening]

lysis

(lī′sĭs)
n. pl. ly·ses (-sēz)
1. Biochemistry The dissolution or destruction of cells, such as blood cells or bacteria, as by the action of a specific lysin that disrupts the cell membrane.
2. Medicine The gradual subsiding of the symptoms of an acute disease.

lysis

Destruction of cells with release of contents. See Antibody-mediated lysis, Cytolysis, Follicle lysis, Hemolysis, NK-mediated lysis.

ly·sis

(lī'sis)
1. Destruction of red blood cells, bacteria, and other structures by a specific lysin, usually referred to by the structure destroyed (e.g., hemolysis, bacteriolysis, nephrolysis); may be due to a direct toxin or an immune mechanism, such as antibody reacting with antigen on the surface of a target cell, usually by binding and activation of a series of proteins in the blood with enzymatic activity (complement system).
2. Gradual subsidence of the symptoms of an acute disease; a form of the recovery process, as distinguished from crisis.
[G. dissolution or loosening]

lysis

The destruction of a living cell by disruption of its membrane. Haemolysis is lysis of red blood cells. This will occur if the cells are placed in plain water.

lysis

the rupturing of a cell with release of its contents; for example, the bursting of a bacterial cell to release BACTERIOPHAGES, or HAEMOLYSIS - the bursting of a red blood cell (see RHESUS HAEMOLYTIC ANAEMIA).

ly·sis

(lī'sis)
1. Destruction of red blood cells, bacteria, and other structures by a specific lysin, usually referred to by structure destroyed (e.g., hemolysis, bacteriolysis, nephrolysis).
2. Gradual subsidence of symptoms of an acute disease, a form of recovery.
[G. dissolution or loosening]
References in periodicals archive ?
Request a Sample Copy of the Global Cell Lysis & Disruption Market Research Report @ https://www.grandviewresearch.com/industry-analysis/cell-lysis-dissociation-market/request/rs1
The absorbance of the supernatant will be a measure of hemoglobin present in it and hence a measure of red cell lysis that had taken place.
In some cases, cells with large, open spaces suggestive of cell lysis were also found.
The induced expression of such ligands renders cancer cells more vulnerable to NK cell lysis [10].
The inhibitory effects of HF on NK cell function were investigated by measuring LDH release after Yac-1 cell lysis and by assessing NKG2D expression using flow cytometry analysis of the resulting population.
The BD MAX System--an automated workstation for molecular testing--automates cell lysis, nucleic-acid extraction, PCR set-up, amplification, and detection.
A longer turnaround time for the plasma specimen (approximately 45 min for plasma vs approximately 15 min for whole blood) may have further increased cell lysis and hence the pseudohyperkalemia.
Late infection results in cell lysis from cell death.
Each slurry sample (1 mL) was transferred to a plastic centrifuge tube (14 mL; Sarstedt, Inc., Numbrecht, Germany) and frozen (-20[degrees]C) until cell lysis and extraction and precipitation of DNA with ethanol was implemented.
These filter plates are designed with a variety of membranes for specific high-throughput applications like cell lysis, etc.
The extract, however, had an unexpected cytotoxicity (cell lysis) at 4 [degrees]C at all times of incubation.
In addition, the blood cell-associated fluorescence was measured after cell lysis with sodium dodecyl sulfate.