lysis

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Related to Cell lysate: lysis, lysing

lysis

 [li´sis]
1. destruction, as of cells by a specific lysin.
2. decomposition, as of a chemical compound by a specific agent. See also degradation.
3. mobilization of an organ by division of restraining adhesions.
4. the gradual abatement of the symptoms of a disease.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ly·sis

(lī'sis),
1. Destruction of red blood cells, bacteria, and other structures by a specific lysin, usually referred to by the structure destroyed (for example, hemolysis, bacteriolysis, nephrolysis); may be due to a direct toxin or an immune mechanism, such as antibody reacting with antigen on the surface of a target cell, usually by binding and activation of a series of proteins in the blood with enzymatic activity (complement system).
2. Gradual subsidence of the symptoms of an acute disease, a form of the recovery process, as distinguished from crisis.
[G. dissolution or loosening]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

lysis

(lī′sĭs)
n. pl. ly·ses (-sēz)
1. Biochemistry The dissolution or destruction of cells, such as blood cells or bacteria, as by the action of a specific lysin that disrupts the cell membrane.
2. Medicine The gradual subsiding of the symptoms of an acute disease.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

lysis

Destruction of cells with release of contents. See Antibody-mediated lysis, Cytolysis, Follicle lysis, Hemolysis, NK-mediated lysis.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

ly·sis

(lī'sis)
1. Destruction of red blood cells, bacteria, and other structures by a specific lysin, usually referred to by the structure destroyed (e.g., hemolysis, bacteriolysis, nephrolysis); may be due to a direct toxin or an immune mechanism, such as antibody reacting with antigen on the surface of a target cell, usually by binding and activation of a series of proteins in the blood with enzymatic activity (complement system).
2. Gradual subsidence of the symptoms of an acute disease; a form of the recovery process, as distinguished from crisis.
[G. dissolution or loosening]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

lysis

The destruction of a living cell by disruption of its membrane. Haemolysis is lysis of red blood cells. This will occur if the cells are placed in plain water.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

lysis

the rupturing of a cell with release of its contents; for example, the bursting of a bacterial cell to release BACTERIOPHAGES, or HAEMOLYSIS - the bursting of a red blood cell (see RHESUS HAEMOLYTIC ANAEMIA).
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

ly·sis

(lī'sis)
1. Destruction of red blood cells, bacteria, and other structures by a specific lysin, usually referred to by structure destroyed (e.g., hemolysis, bacteriolysis, nephrolysis).
2. Gradual subsidence of symptoms of an acute disease, a form of recovery.
[G. dissolution or loosening]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Salazar-Onfray, "Tumor cell lysates as immunogenic sources for cancer vaccine design," Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics, vol.
2 (right), when 5 [micro]g of cell lysate protein was used per assay, an increase in GALC activity above that measured with 100% null lysate (GM06805LOW) was readily measured when this lysate was spiked with 0.5% GM13793-HIGH lysate.
coli LPS (1 [micro]g/mL) for 24 h, after which iNOS protein synthesis was determined by immunoblot analysis of cell lysates using iNOS-specific antibody.
The reducing power of extracellular secretion was the highest cell lysate take the second place Antioxidative ability the most important organism member of defense sysetem is closely related with health.
Total Protein Assay: A chromatic BCA total protein assay kit was purchased from Thermo Fisher Scientific (Rockford, IL) and performed on cell lysates in accordance with the manufacturers' suggested protocols.
The cell lysates were precleared with protein G-Sepharose beads (GE Healthcare) for 30 min at 4[degrees]C and then incubated with anti-Myc or anti-Flag antibody (Sigma) for 2 h at 4[degrees]C.
The method was applied to analyze KAc stoichiometry on proteins from nuclear and whole cell lysates, leading to the identification and quantification of ~750 acetylated peptides.
In cell culture studies, apigenin treatment resulted in cell growth inhibition and induction of apoptosis, which correlated with increased accumulation of IGFBP-3 in culture medium and cell lysate. These effects were associated with significant reduction in IGF-I secretion; inhibition of IGF-I-induced cell cycle progression and insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) tyrosine phosphorylation, along with an increase in sub-G1 peak by apigenin.
In the in vitro assay, SK-N-SH cell lysate was incubated with TCDD ([10.sup.-11] to [10.sup.-9] M), BW284c51 (a specific inhibitor of AChE; Sigma), at 2 x [10.sup.-5] M, or 0.1% DMSO alone (control).
Cell lysate was obtained by crushing the scaffolds while they were submerged in lysis buffer, followed by centrifugation.
coli cell lysate was added to the resin, and was put on a horizontal shaker for 1 hour at room temperature allowing the cell lysate to interact with the beads.
Western blotting: Recombinant HPV-16 L1 (rL1) expression profile from the crude cell lysate of the yeast clones was obtained by immtmoblot.