genome

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Related to Cell genome: genomic DNA

genome

 [je´nōm]
the complete set of genes, hereditary factors contained in the haploid set of chromosomes; the human genome has an estimated 30,000 to 40,000 genes. adj., adj genom´ic.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ge·nome

(je'nōm, -nom),
1. A complete set of chromosomes derived from one parent, the haploid number of a gamete.
See also: Human Genome Project.
2. The total gene complement of a set of chromosomes found in higher life forms (the haploid set in a eukaryotic cell), or the functionally similar but simpler linear arrangements found in bacteria and viruses.
See also: Human Genome Project.
[gene + -ome, suffix denoting a defined system or microcosm, fr. G. -ōma, noun suffix]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

genome

(jē′nōm′)
n.
1. The total genetic content contained in a haploid set of chromosomes in eukaryotes, in a single chromosome in bacteria or archaea, or in the DNA or RNA of viruses.
2. An organism's genetic material.

ge·no′mic (-nō′mĭk) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

genome

Genetic structure Genetics All the genetic information in an organism's chromosomes and mitochondria; its size is given in base pairs. See Base pair, Chromosome, Mitochondrial genome, Nuclear genome.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

ge·nome

(jē'nōm)
1. A complete set of chromosomes derived from one parent, the haploid number of a gamete.
2. The total gene complement of a set of chromosomes found in higher life forms (the haploid set in a eukaryotic cell), or the functionally similar but simpler linear arrangements found in bacteria and viruses.
See also: Human Genome Project
[G. genos, birth + (chromos) ome]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

genome

The complete set of CHROMOSOMES, together with the MITOCHONDRIAL DNA, containing the entire genetic material of the cell.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

genome

the complete complement of genetic material in a cell, or carried by an individual.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Genome

The genetic makeup of a cell, composed of DNA.
Mentioned in: Malignant Melanoma
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

genome

The complete set of genes in an individual. In humans it is estimated at approximately 30 000 genes and over three billion base pairs (two nucleotides joined together across a double helix) of DNA.
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann

ge·nome

(jē'nōm)
Complete set of chromosomes derived from one parent; haploid number of a gamete.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Zhang's team analyzed Tet1's occupancy across the entire mouse embryonic stem cell genome. They found that the protein works by using a two-pronged approach to maintain the mouse embryonic stem cell state.
Zhang's team analyzed Tet1's occupancy across the entire mouse embryonic stem cell genome. They found that die protein works by using a two-pronged approach to maintain the mouse embryonic stem cell state.
Many mechanisms for integration of transfected plasmids into mammalian cell genomes such as CHO cells have been suggested in publications, but none of the proposed mechanisms explains the results that are obtained when analyzing the genomes and transgene structures of CHO production cell lines.
This edition has been revised and updated to include recent advances and information on the tumor microenvironment, metastatic dissemination, tumor immunology, cancer stem cells, the epithelial-mesenchymal transition, multi-step tumorigenesis, invasion and metastasis, mutation of cancer cell genomes, epigenetic contributions, microRNA involvement, and the Warburg effect, with more on traditional therapy and a new list of key techniques.
In one, bacteria and viruses--which are naturally able to penetrate cells--are deployed as delivery vehicles to shuttle genes directly into plant cell genomes. In another, tiny particles coated with a gene are propelled at high speeds into cells to deliver the gene.
This month's installment of The Primer will focus on another application which has been steadily gaining interest over the past half-decade: sequencing of the variable recombinant portions of B and T cell genomes, in a process known generally as immune repertoire analysis.
These observations have been made possible thanks to mass sequencing of tumor cell genomes. Third, these two proteins, Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b, are altered in many types of tumor, such as those encountered in leukemia, the lung, and the colon.
But in practice, editing T cell genomes with CRISPR/Cas9 has proved surprisingly difficult, said Alexander Marson, PhD, a UCSF Sandler Fellow, and senior and co-corresponding author of the new study.