cell culture

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Related to Cell cultures: adherent cell, Cell lines

culture

 [kul´cher]
1. the propagation of microorganisms or of living tissue cells in special media conducive to their growth.
2. to induce such propagation.
3. the product of such propagation.
4. the shared values, beliefs, and practices of a particular group of people, which are transmitted from one generation to the next and are identified as patterns that guide the thinking and action of the group members. adj., adj cul´tural.
cell culture the maintenance or growth of animal cells in vitro, or a culture of such cells.
blood culture microbiologic examination of a blood sample to check for presence of microorganisms.
continuous flow culture the cultivation of bacteria in a continuous flow of fresh medium to maintain bacterial growth in logarithmic phase.
enrichment culture one grown on a medium, usually liquid, that has been supplemented to encourage the growth of a given type of organism.
hanging-drop culture a culture in which the material to be cultivated is inoculated into a drop of fluid attached to a coverglass inverted over a hollow slide.
primary culture a cell or tissue culture made by direct transfer from a natural source to an artificial medium.
selective culture one grown on a medium, usually solid, that has been supplemented to encourage the growth of a single species of microorganism. It may also include substances that inhibit the growth of other species.
shake culture a culture made by inoculating warm liquid agar culture medium in a tube and shaking to distribute contents evenly. Incubation of the resolidified culture allows the development of separated colonies; especially adaptable to obligate anaerobes.
slant culture one made on the surface of solidified medium in a tube which has been tilted to provide a greater surface area for growth.
culture-specific syndrome folk illnesses that are unique to a particular culture or geographical area. Each illness has a cluster of symptoms, signs, and behavioral changes that are recognized by members of the culture; usually, they also have a range of symbolic meanings and culturally agreed-upon treatments. Anorexia nervosa and Type A behavior pattern are examples of syndromes specific to industrialized cultures.
stab culture a culture into which the organisms are introduced by thrusting a needle deep into the medium.
streak culture a culture in which the surface of a solid medium is inoculated by drawing across it, in a zig-zag fashion, a wire inoculating loop carrying the inoculum.
suspension culture a culture in which cells multiply while suspended in a suitable medium.
tissue culture the maintaining or growing of tissue, organ primordia, or the whole or part of an organ in vitro so as to preserve its architecture and function.
type culture a culture of a species of microorganism usually maintained in a central collection of type cultures.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

cell cul·ture

the maintenance or growth of dispersed cells after removal from the body, commonly on a glass surface immersed in nutrient fluid.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

cell culture

n.
1. The technique or process of growing bacterial or fungal cells or cells derived from tissues of living organisms in a culture medium.
2. A culture of cells grown by this technique or process.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

cell cul·ture

(sel kŭl'chŭr)
The maintenance or growth of dispersed cells after removal from the body, commonly on a glass surface immersed in nutrient fluid.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

cell cul·ture

(sel kŭl'chŭr)
The maintenance or growth of dispersed cells after removal from the body, commonly on a glass surface immersed in nutrient fluid.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
According to report published by Grand View Research, The global 3D cell culture market size was valued at USD 558.0 million in 2016, exhibiting a 14.8% CAGR during the forecast period.
How the Medicines Discovery Catapult is using 3D cell cultures in collaborative projects
Galactose, fructose and maltose significantly increased protein production by the factor of 1.7, 2.0 and 2.2, respectively.The study extends understanding of augmented use of superior carbohydrate in cell culture media to improve growth of hybridoma cells and subsequently higher yields of antibody.
The development of three-dimensional (3D) cell culture systems has greatly expanded over the past few decades.
"3D Cell Culture Market, 2015 -- 2025," May 2015, Roots Analysis Private Ltd, 241 pages, $2,199.
The amount of pigment produced in the cells cultured in medium supplemented with 45, 60 and 75g/L sucrose achieved high pigment production of 0.88-1.48CV/flask, each of which was significantly different from the other sets of cell cultures. Among these three treatment, culture supplemented with 45g/L sucrose showed the highest growth index (1.12), highest dried cell mass with fairly high pigment production and content, hence the addition of 45g/L sucrose into the cell culture of M.
Contaminants corrupt cell cultures and the results.
Besides offering a new testing regime intermediate between cell cultures and intact organisms, animal-on-a-chip tests could provide data that render those other categories of testing more precise and effective, the chips' developers say.
Characterization of the Virus in EBN Primary Kidney Cell Cultures
The researchers compared osteopontin levels in a benchmark healthy ovarian epithelial cell culture with those of 4 other healthy ovarian epithelial cell cultures, 10 serous-type ovarian epithelial cancer cell lines, 2 mucinous-type ovarian cancer cell lines, and 2 clear cell-type ovarian cancer cell lines.
Using 3D cell cultures to fight anti-cancer therapy resistance: An important goal in modern cancer research is the development of individualised, more targeted therapies, with higher specificities, for cancer patients - precision medicine.