celebrity worship syndrome

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celebrity worship syndrome

A common condition of intense preoccupation with all ascertainable aspects, real or media-contrived, of the life of a current ‘star’ personality. In severe cases the syndrome amounts to an obsession that may feature stalking and other criminal activity. The syndrome is now taken seriously by psychologists and even by some anthropologists who hold that celebrities have always provided useful role models. Fortunately, for most, celebrity worship is no more than a harmless entertainment.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
This contention is supported by the work of celebrity worship scholars whose results reveal that individuals try to find fulfillment and a "more complete" sense of identity through absorption with their favorite celebrity or persona (Reeves, Baker, & Truluck, 2013, p.
Women who fell under Kelly's spell, some who were as young as 13, speak out for the first time, illustrating the dark side of fame, the perils of celebrity worship and double standards when it comes to race in the #MeToo era.
I've often wondered if the search for such men is connected to our fixation with conventional masculinity, and if that has led us to become overly reliant on salacious social marketing campaigns and spiritually bankrupt events anchored by celebrity worship (or ubiquitous gift cards), rather than the power of the space and incentive of community.
Celebrity worship gave us Trump and President Park Geun-hye.
"It's a form of celebrity worship. The celebrities in this case are celebrity killers - the Columbine killers."
Dr Al Sindi blamed social media and celebrity worship for factors contributing to the disorder, adding the large number of celebrities having plastic surgery was driving down the threshold for going under the knife.
had sexism and racism and all of that stuff, and Versace-Cunanan has a huge amount of homophobia and celebrity worship 6 and why did that happen in that beginning of that culture?" he said.
In my review of the original production in this magazine, I wrote: "The operas main themes of youthful angst, crime and terrorism, savage capitalism, concentration of power, celebrity worship and soulless urbanism are more relevant than ever." Today's political scene only reinforces this: from his penthouse, one of the opera's main characters, the billionaire businessman Zero Janvier, uses his clout and money to get elected President of the Western World--how not to draw a parallel with Donald Trump?--by promising to close borders to foreign influence while, down below, those "with no past and no future" try to make themselves heard by blowing up buildings.
Kill the Boy Band does a fine job of scrutinizing the world of celebrity worship. Readers of Kody Keplinger's Duff (Little, Brown, 2010/VOYA October 2010) will enjoy this sarcastic, hard-hitting book geared to the high school audience.--Adrienne Amborski.
Vermes' book reminds us of our disgust for celebrity worship of our existing (or potential) leaders that is based on their looks, bank accounts or their ability to 'win' the vapid 24-hour news cycle with a catchy tweet, or to infiltrate your Facebook feed with a choice nugget about a political opponent." ESTHER CEPEDA
She delivers a scalpel-sharp dissection of celebrity worship - with "nation's sweetheart" Cheryl Cole, Peter Andre and Tulisa all finding themselves in her crosshairs alongside the media which builds them up and knocks them down.
His proposal that "the object of identification in celebrity worship is not a particular person but the public sphere itself" is suggestive (106, cf.