cavitation

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Related to Cavitation inception: cavitation erosion, Cavitation number, cavitation damage

cavitation

 [kav″ĭ-ta´shun]
1. cavity.
2. the formation of cavities.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

cav·i·ta·tion

(kav'i-tā'shŭn),
1. Formation of a cavity, as in the lung in tuberculosis or with development of a bacterial lung abscess.
2. The production of small vapor-containing bubbles or cavities in a liquid or tissue by ultrasound.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

cavitation

(kăv′ĭ-tā′shən)
n.
1. The sudden formation and collapse of low-pressure bubbles in liquids by means of mechanical forces, such as those resulting from rotation of a marine propeller.
2. The pitting of a solid surface.
3. Medicine The formation of cavities in a body tissue or an organ, especially those formed in the lung as a result of tuberculosis.

cav′i·tate′ v.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

cav·i·ta·tion

(kav-i-tā'shŭn)
1. Formation of a cavity, as in the lung in tuberculosis.
2. The production of small, vapor-containing bubbles or cavities in a liquid by ultrasound.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

cav·i·ta·tion

(kav-i-tā'shŭn)
1. Formation of tiny bubbles in water exiting tip of an electronic instrument; when collapsing, these bubbles produce bactericidal shock waves that act by tearing bacterial cell walls.
2. Formation of a cavity.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about cavitation

Q. What are the effects of alcoholism on the oral cavity? I have to make a presentation on this topic, and I would like to know what are the main pathological effects of chronic alcoholism on the oral cavity, I know that it is a carcinogen, but it mainly acts as a promoter, is there any cancer that is caused by alcohol abuse?

A. alcohol can interact harmfully with several medications commonly used in dental treatment. Alcohol intensifies the depressant effect of barbituates and tranquilizers creating a higher risk of deep sedation and unconsciousness. Following treatment, the ability to drive may be impaired. Medications used to control high blood pressure and angina have a dilating effect on the blood vessels which is intensified by alcohol.

The result is a higher likelihood of low blood pressure and fainting. Even the action of aspirin is intensified by alcohol, causing excessive bleeding by disrupting clot formation

Q. what happens if a dentist fills a cavity with some caries left on the tooth? the cavity was deep ,close to the nerve. Didn’t make nerve exposure.?

A. If it wasn’t removed properly – you will have what they call – “recurrent cries”. It’ll continue growing without you seeing it until you’ll come back to the dentist again because of the pain. I suggest you’ll save the pain part and go now.

Q. what happens if a dentist fills a cavity with some caries left on the tooth? the cavity was deep ,close to the nerve. Didn’t make nerve exposure.?

A. If that is so, then you will need to have him remove all the decay, the refill. If it is too close to the nerves then they may have to do a root canal. That means take out the filling, the tooth pulp and fill it up.

More discussions about cavitation
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References in periodicals archive ?
Besides, we could also define the inflection points of vibration energy starting to rise as the cavitation inception, namely, the dots in Figure 10.
Because the pressure at the location of cavitation is usually below the saturated vapor pressure, the vapor pressure of the liquid is adopted as the cavitation inception pressure in this mathematical model for transient cavitation.
(1981), Cavitation Inception in Spool Valves, Journal Fluids Engineering, ASME, Vol 103 (4), pp564-576, ISSN: 00982-202.
Experimental investigations of cavitation inception (5), cavitation damage (6), and depolymerization (7) have indicated that the type of polymer solution and its concentration can be important factors in cavitation phenomena.