corrosive injury

(redirected from Caustic Injury)
An injury of muco-cutaneous surfaces—e.g., eyes, oesophagus, skin—with tissue destruction due to direct contact with a strong acid—coagulation necrosis—or with a strong base—liquefactive necrosis
Epidemiology ±26,000/year, US
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

corrosive injury

Caustic injury, corrosion of tissue Public health An injury of mucocutaneous surfaces–eg, eyes, esophagus, skin, with tissue destruction due to direct contact with a strong acid–coagulation necrosis, or with a strong base–liquefactive necrosis Epidemiology ±26,000/yr–US, 1988
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Clinical evaluation and management of caustic injury in the upper gastrointestinal tract in 95 adult patients in an urban medical center.
Drops used to constitute homemade alkaline water can cause a caustic injury if they are at full strength (not diluted in water) and contact skin.
Scarpignato, "Caustic injury of the upper gastrointestinal tract: a comprehensive review," World Journal of Gastroenterology, vol.
Oesophageal replacement was performed for 3 (7.6%) patients following caustic injury. Five (13%) patients died: two following perforations, including the HIV-infected patient who underwent oesophageal stenting; one following surgical replacement of the oesophagus; and two from unrelated sepsis.
"The epithelial mucosa stayed intact for far longer than it should have--up to 3 weeks--if acid simply caused a caustic injury as the mechanism of cell death and replacement," Dr.
The results of upper endoscopy in this study showed that grade 3b injuries were the most common caustic injury (30.04%), followed by grade 2b injuries (22.71%).
The destruction of esophageal stem cells during caustic injury and loss of regeneration capacity of the organ could easily be asserted for fibrotic healing process instead of renewal, after such a demolition.
A child who has swallowed a mouthful of bleach and is crying is unlikely to suffer caustic injury She will probably vomit, as bleach is an effective emetic, but no action needs to be taken.
Although international literature denotes balloon dilatation to be superior to SGB in the management of benign oesophageal strictures in children,[1-7] especially as a result of caustic injury,[11] we noted no complications with either balloon or SGB dilatation techniques despite the aetiology.
Electrolyte leakage from battery causing caustic injury.