catkin

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catkin

an INFLORESCENCE usually in the form of a pendulous spike of unisexual, much-reduced flowers, e.g. the male catkin of hazel, which produces pollen to be distributed by the wind.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Current signs you can keep a lookout for are: snowdrops; hazel trees flowering (catkins); lesser celandine flowers and frogspawn.
We have observed that Black Bears in southeastern Alaska frequently climb Black Cottonwood (Populus trichocarpa) trees to eat flowering catkins and seed pods in spring (Fig.
While the trees will extend the seasons with the catkins and early flowers, we have in addition planted a number of species for the colours and textures of their bark such as the Himalayan birch with its strikingly white trunk.
To control for slight size differences among branches, we calculated the proportion of long shoots and female catkins from the total number of shoots in the branches (total shoot number = number of vegetative short shoots + number of short shoots bearing female catkins + number of long shoots).
And over all were broken-off catkins of pussy willow.
He found that only the diet, composed of either catkins o r leaves, mattered.
The hazel is wind pollinated, so the pollen from the catkins is blown to the delicate female flowers.
OUTSIDE the greenhouse, the hazel is full of catkins - I wonder if it's going to be another bumper year for blossom?
You can already see from its buds, but more particularly from its emerging catkins, that this is no ordinary hazel.
Caption: While these ads offer a glimpse at the evolution of the same brand and product, Havens points out that they're also a great before-and-after case for the marketing influence of Earnest Catkins of Catkins & Holden.
Garrya elliptica is a handsome evergreen shrub with olive green foliage and long greyish green catkins in January and February.
The three most common members of the family, hazel, birch and alder, are all in flower, male catkins dangling and dancing in the slightest breeze, and tiny female flowers, green on birch, red on alder and hazel, await the wind blown pollen which turns them into cones on birches and alders and nuts on hazels.