cathepsin

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Related to Cathepsin G: Chymase, Proteinase 3

cathepsin

 [kah-thep´sin]
an endopeptidase found in most cells, which takes part in cell autolysis and self-digestion of tissues.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ca·thep·sin

(kă-thep'sin),
One of a number of intracellular proteinases and peptidases (all endopeptidases) of animal tissues of varying specificities.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

cathepsin

(kə-thĕp′sĭn)
n.
Any of various enzymes found in animal tissue that catalyze the hydrolysis of proteins into smaller proteins.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

cathepsin

Any ENZYME that acts to split the interior PEPTIDE bonds of a protein, causing its decomposition.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

cathepsin

or

kathepsin

the intracellular, proteolytic enzymes that bring about AUTOLYSIS.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
In this study, we found that cathepsin G induces the formation of multicellular aggregates in low metastatic and E-cadherin-positive MCF-7 cells, while reducing the adherent capacity of highly metastatic and E-cadherin-negative MDA MB-231 cells to culture substrates.
Cathepsin G secreted by neutrophils infiltrating intratumor environments is a candidate factor that influences the metastatic capacity of tumor cells.
We observed that in the presence of cathepsin G, MCF-7 cells move to make contact with adjacent cells.
The aim of the present study was to determine whether the induction of cell aggregation of cathepsin G and other proteases is cell-oriented or is the result of adhesion molecule degradation on the culture substrates.
To understand whether the activity of cathepsin G and other proteases depends only on the digestion of adhesion molecules on the culture substrate, we used western blotting analysis to first estimate FN decomposition after cathepsin G treatment of FN-coated plates.
Treatment with cathepsin G, but not elastase, induced cell aggregation on PLL substrates, although cathepsin G did not decompose PLL.
In summary, in contrast to elastase, cathepsin G may induce cell aggregation of MCF-7 cells through a cell-oriented mechanism in addition to degrading substrate adhesion molecules.
Yamazaki, "Induction of multicellular 3-D spheroids of MCF-7 breast carcinoma cells by neutrophil-derived cathepsin G and elastase," Cancer Science, vol.
Yui, "Cathepsin G, a neutrophil protease, induces compact cell-cell adhesion in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells," Mediators of Inflammation, vol.
Pohl, "Bactericidal activity of a synthetic peptide (CG 117-136) of human lysosomal cathepsin G is dependent on arginine content," Infection and Immunity, vol.
Janze et al., "Cathepsin G and neutrophil elastase play critical and nonredundant roles in lung-protective immunity against Streptococcus pneumoniae in mice," Infection and Immunity, vol.
Coughlin, "Cathepsin G activates protease-activated receptor-4 in human platelets,"The Journal of Biological Chemistry, vol.