catechol

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cat·e·chol

(kat'ĕ-kol),
1. Synonym(s): pyrocatechol
2. Term loosely used for catechin, which contains an o-catechol moiety, and as the root of catecholamines, which are pyrocatechol derivatives.

catechol

/cat·e·chol/ (kat´ah-kol)

catechol

a phenol containing a benzene ring with adjacent hydroxyl groups. see CATECHOLAMINE.

catechol

a compound, o-dehydroxybenzene, used as a reagent and comprising the aromatic portion in the synthesis of catecholamines.
References in periodicals archive ?
Then, the modified MMT was coated onto a surface using the reaming catechol moiety [15, 16].
21) These enzymes convert estrone (E1) and estradiol (E2) into catechol metabolites allowing for phase 2 detoxification in the liver via methylation and glucuronidation pathways.
E2 is metabolized by cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1B1 into reactive catechols that undergo redox cycling, resulting in oxidative stress, DNA adduct formation, and DNA mutations (Cavalieri and Rogan 2004; Chakravarti et al.
We assayed plasma concentrations of catechols by alumina extraction followed by HPLC with electrochemical detection; coefficients of correlation for the assay have been published (5,6).
Hydroxyl radical formation via iron-mediated fenton chemistry is inhibited by methylated catechols.
flavonoids, catechols, phenylpropenoids, quinones, lignans, stilbenes, gallic acid derivatives) which are found in abundance in our daily diet.
Phenol and guaiacol appeared first, followed by all catechols and syringol, ending up with higher molecular weight compounds, ranging from vanillin to syringaldehyde.
Separate chapters list protection for the hydroxyl group, phenols and catechols, the carbonyl group, the carboxyl group, the thiol group, the amino group, and the phosphate group.
Potent bioactives include alpha-tocopherol, ascorbic acid, curcumin (from turmeric--a common food coloring spice from India), catechins and catechols (from green tea), epigallocatechin gallate (from tea), genistein (from soy), lycopene (from tomato), omega-3 fatty acids, resveratrol (from grapes) and theaflavins (from black tea).
Synthesis and identification of alkenyl and alkadienyl catechols from Brimese Lac.
Because oxidation of catechols was expected to occur in seawater, larvae were placed into fresh FSW and newly prepared chemical solutions every 12 h.
The catechols in urushiol are soluble in rubber, therefore rubber gloves and rubber boots are not protective (Rietschel & Fowler, 2001a).